How to make coffee

  • #26
Integral
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Moonbear said:
I was hoping if I kept them as whole beans until use, the flavor loss would be slower than if I brought them home already ground. Is that not the case?
Yes, that is correct, whole bean is the best way to store in any circumstance.
Typically, how long are they already stored from the time they are roasted until the time they get to the store or coffee shop? I'm not sure that a hopper at the store is only going to have enough for one day's sales, but maybe it does. Or are they getting them vacuum-packed before they are put out for bulk sale?
How long they are in the store or on the shelf can vary wildly! I think vacummn packing is the best for long term storage. At the shop I linked to, he roasts small batchs (~5 gal jar) and stores them in the freezer at night, out on the counter in the jar in the day. I feel that his is about as close to fresh roasted as I can get.

One upon a time I worked for a different local coffee roaster reparing coffee makers. I got to assemble a 5 burner Bunn from a cardboard box full of parts (the entire brewer was there, just not assembled!), that was fun. The real neat part of the job is that it was in the basement along side the coffee roasters. After a batch was roasted they would brew a full pot and pour one cup for the owner to sample, the rest of the pot was dumped out in the sink I was working around. All I had to do to get a fresh brewed cup of fresh roasted coffee was stick out my cup! :biggrin: Heaven.
 
  • #27
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I generally tend to prefer my coffee mixed in with hot chocolate to dilute the bitterness that I usually taste. To me, it seems to taste quite a bit better.

edit: Quite a lot actually. Who can resist rich chocolate in one's coffee?
 
  • #28
Integral said:
Yes, that is correct, whole bean is the best way to store in any circumstance.

How long they are in the store or on the shelf can vary wildly! I think vacummn packing is the best for long term storage. At the shop I linked to, he roasts small batchs (~5 gal jar) and stores them in the freezer at night, out on the counter in the jar in the day. I feel that his is about as close to fresh roasted as I can get.

One upon a time I worked for a different local coffee roaster reparing coffee makers. I got to assemble a 5 burner Bunn from a cardboard box full of parts (the entire brewer was there, just not assembled!), that was fun. The real neat part of the job is that it was in the basement along side the coffee roasters. After a batch was roasted they would brew a full pot and pour one cup for the owner to sample, the rest of the pot was dumped out in the sink I was working around. All I had to do to get a fresh brewed cup of fresh roasted coffee was stick out my cup! :biggrin: Heaven.
That would be very interesting, assembling the machines.
There used to be a coffee house around here that roasted their own beans but I think they stopped that after changing owners. They roasted them fresh daily if I remember correctly.
 
  • #29
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I don't know I wouldn't really agree with the idea that plungers make the best coffee.
I'd say that a percolator makes by far the best coffee when done right. But you can 'burn' the coffee by leaving it on too long, leaving a strong bitter coffee. But in the end I guess it comes down to preference.

For the plunger I use about the same amount as Moonbear. 2 tablespoon heaps of coffee per cup.
Anyway for general coffee I use a plunger as well because it's extremely easy and does make a good cup.
Although I also think that espresso machines are up there. If the coffee is ground thin enough it makes an awesome cup of coffee too.
Or you can do what my friend did when he got one...he didn't exactly drink coffee and when his mom got an espresso machine he offered to make me an espresso. So anyway he went over to the machine and filled the coffee holder with INSTANT espresso granules and placed it in the machine. :rofl:
I don't bother putting the beans in the freezer, but I do chuck them in the fridge, because otherwise you're better off making instant.
 
  • #30
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Being the daughter of a woman who drinks upwards of five cups of coffee per day, I've learned a fairly good deal about what makes coffee good. There are many steps to the perfect blend, from bean to cup.

First of all, there's the actual coffee you buy. I reccommend buying whole beans and grinding them at home. That way they stay fresh longer and will have a more full taste. As far as varieties of coffee go, I tend to find that the slightly more expensive brands are so for a reason: they taste better. Try buying small amounts of various types until you find blends you like. Personally, I like Kona, but that's just my taste.

Secondly, how you store your coffee will affect its flavor. Keep whole beans in their bag and ground beans in a Ziploc or Tupperware container. If you don't drink coffee often, keep the beans in the freezer for freshness. Grind small amounts at a time, just a few days' supply, so that they will retain flavor longer.

Of course, brewing is vital to the coffee process. A good French press can make all the difference in the world. Place approximately one tablespoon of coffee grounds per cup of coffee in the bottom of the press and fill it with water that is just shy of boiling, then let it sit for about 3 minutes before pressing. Coffee is just like tea in that the longer it sits, the richer the taste. Just don't overdo it, or it will be too bitter.

Believe it or not, the coffee cup itself can change the coffee experience too. Some cups cool too quickly for a slow drinker, and some are clumsy shapes to hold. My mother has one that holds the equivalent of three other mugs because she drinks so much at one sitting. Find a cup that suits your taste, and you'll enjoy it all the more.
 
  • #31
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My guide to making a good cup of coffee:

"Honey, will brew some Java(as in Java the actual type of coffe not Java the generaic name for coffee)?"

"Regular or Decaf?"

"Oh, it's still early---I guess regular will do."

5 minutes later a huge cup of coffee materializes next to me. I don't see what all the fuss is about really :tongue: .
 
  • #32
faust9 said:
My guide to making a good cup of coffee:

"Honey, will brew some Java(as in Java the actual type of coffe not Java the generaic name for coffee)?"

"Regular or Decaf?"

"Oh, it's still early---I guess regular will do."

5 minutes later a huge cup of coffee materializes next to me. I don't see what all the fuss is about really :tongue: .
I'd love a coffee maker like that. Preferably one with other functions as well. I have no problem with a large investment of time and care taking either.
 
  • #33
Moonbear
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TheStatutoryApe said:
I'd love a coffee maker like that. Preferably one with other functions as well. I have no problem with a large investment of time and care taking either.
Yeah, that sounds like a good one. I might even tolerate the occassional weak cup of coffee as a trade-off for the convenience and other perks. :tongue2:
 
  • #34
Moonbear said:
Yeah, that sounds like a good one. I might even tolerate the occassional weak cup of coffee as a trade-off for the convenience and other perks. :tongue2:
"Will you take this man to be your coffee maker, to have and to hold, till a weak drip do you part?" :biggrin:
 
  • #35
Moonbear
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TheStatutoryApe said:
"Will you take this man to be your coffee maker, to have and to hold, till a weak drip do you part?" :biggrin:
They have medication to treat that weak drip nowadays. :biggrin: :rofl:
 
  • #36
Math Is Hard
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Make coffee? What is this strange use of the verb "make"? In L.A. we buy coffee. It is produced by professional barristas. I would not assume that I have the skill or training to "make" coffee.
 
  • #37
Integral
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According to my recent experiance, LA is in the back woods as far as decent coffee goes.
 
  • #38
Ivan Seeking
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Integral said:
According to my recent experiance, LA is in the back woods as far as decent coffee goes.
Yep, that's pretty much why we moved to Oregon. :tongue2:
 
  • #39
honestrosewater
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Oh, if you freeze your coffee, be sure to keep it frozen the whole time. I don't remember what happened, a storm or something, but the electricity went out, and my coffee in the freezer thawed and refroze. It had a serious mayonnaise flavor- like I stirred in a heaping glob of mayonnaise. :yuck:
Also, coffee is very porous, so be sure it is kept sealed, unless you like a "everything in my freezer" aroma.
 
  • #40
Integral said:
According to my recent experiance, LA is in the back woods as far as decent coffee goes.
There are decent places. It's just that most people have been brain washed to believe that Starbucks is good coffee. That and telling them that a small is tall and medium is "grande". I tried very had to deactivate the brainwashing when I was working at the Natale's Coffee.
 

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