How/why music causes emotion?

  • Thread starter Avichal
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  • #126
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Sorry, couldn't resist :tongue: just saw the musical!
More than one person has noted the intrinsic irony there.

Personally, when I need to get back in touch with my masculine nucleus , I don't 'walk like a man'...I walk hard.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lOW2IjpM-4
 
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  • #127
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I think the idea is not that you have to wait for tension then resolution to feel something, but that you already have a layout of tension/resolution predictions based on actual social interactions you've already had.
Psychologically this would be true, but the musical counterpart would seem to require tension be established then resolved up or down.

I haven't really decided one way or another on the article, but I thought it was an interesting idea. I can think of contradictions to even their heavily cited statement though: when you say "oohhh kayyy" submissively, you drop in down (not raise) and when a tiger goes from a rumbling to a dominant growl, they rise in tone (not lower).
I think it's an interesting article also, but it's essentially spinning eccentrically, like an unbalanced tire.
 
  • #128
Pythagorean
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Psychologically this would be true, but the musical counterpart would seem to require tension be established then resolved up or down.

I'm not sure how you come to the conclusion about what the musical counterpart requires. Remember that when people speak, their tones are monophonic and variation is distributed temporally (from one tone to the next).

In a chord, we're able to distribute tones "spatially" (polyphonically) so there's a disconnect. The leap in this article is figuring out how the brain interprets polyphonic sounds in terms of monophonic social tones. The idea proposed is that if you hear a resolve chord, you "subconsciously imagine" it came from harmonic tension. Not that I'm arguing for that idea, just making sure you understand what you're arguing against. It doesn't seem like the spinning simile you proposed to me, though. It just seems a little unfounded to me.

Monophonic melodies are a lot simpler, since you can directly draw analogies between speech patterns and melodies.

What I wonder... is what the temporal structures of a chord look like. Within the beat notes, is there inherently a melody that quickly draws and resolves tension in a periodic fashion? It's nonlinear too, as the note rings, some frequencies decay faster than others. The harmonics, attack, decay, and sustain of the notes probably all play a role too (i.e. a piano and a violin note sound much different from each other).
 
  • #129
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I'm not sure how you come to the conclusion about what the musical counterpart requires.
The musical counterpart has been translated into a stylized version of speech tones based on a tone and its natural harmonics and the chords and scales and everything else that naturally results.
 
  • #130
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Can someone just summarize the whole discussion for me. I did (try to) read all the 100+ posts but just to make sure I didn't miss anything.
All I could gather was: -
1) Change in the frequency of music is somehow interpreted as elevation or depression.
2) If the music contains words, their meanings can cause emotions.
3) Its still a big mystery!
 

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