How you could find E'/E at the min of 180 degrees

  • Thread starter dranger35
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In summary, the Compton Scattering formula allows for the calculation of E'/E by using the equation (E-E')/E E' = (1/mc^2)(1-cos@). If the scattering angle is at 180 degrees, the formula becomes E'/E = mc^2/(2E + mc^2). This formula can be derived using simple algebra and can be applied to any value for the scattering angle.
  • #1
dranger35
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From the Comptom Scattering formula, you get
(E-E')/E E' = (1/mc^2)(1-cos@).

Can someone tell me how you could find E'/E at the min of 180 degrees. I've tried using the conjugate, and other methods, but I can't get E'/E out of it. I must be doing something wrong. Thanks.
 
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  • #2
[tex] \frac{1}{E'}-\frac{1}{E}=\frac{2}{mc^{2}} \Rightarrow \frac{E'}{E}=\frac{mc^{2}}{2E+mc^{2}} [/tex]

Daniel.
 
  • #3
Wait

... is the answer just E'/E = mc^2/(2E + mc^2) or
mc^2/(2E + mc^2) (1- cos@).
 
  • #4
You said about [itex] 180 \mbox{deg} [/itex],right...?I assumed you did,and used this fact.How would my formula change,if,instead of that particular value for the scattering angle,you'd use the general case?
It's not difficult,it's simple algebra.

Daniel.
 

Related to How you could find E'/E at the min of 180 degrees

1. How do you calculate E'/E at the minimum of 180 degrees?

To calculate E'/E at the minimum of 180 degrees, you will need to use the derivative of E with respect to the variable, in this case, 180 degrees. This will give you the rate of change of E at the minimum point, and you can then divide it by the value of E at the minimum point to find E'/E.

2. Why is it important to know the value of E'/E at the minimum of 180 degrees?

Knowing the value of E'/E at the minimum of 180 degrees is important because it tells us about the curvature of the function at that point. A higher E'/E value indicates a steeper slope and a sharper minimum point, while a lower value indicates a flatter slope and a smoother minimum point.

3. Can E'/E at the minimum of 180 degrees be negative?

Yes, E'/E at the minimum of 180 degrees can be negative. This means that the function is decreasing at that point, and the slope is pointing downwards. However, the absolute value of E'/E is what is important in determining the curvature of the function.

4. How can you find the minimum point of a function at 180 degrees?

To find the minimum point of a function at 180 degrees, you will need to take the derivative of the function with respect to the variable, set it equal to zero, and solve for the variable. This will give you the x-coordinate of the minimum point. You can then substitute this value back into the original function to find the y-coordinate of the minimum point.

5. What does E'/E represent at the minimum of 180 degrees?

E'/E at the minimum of 180 degrees represents the rate of change of the function E at the minimum point. It tells us how much the function is increasing or decreasing at that point, and can also give us information about the curvature of the function at the minimum point.

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