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HP air Bottle Sizing

  1. Jun 14, 2009 #1
    Senario-1

    I have a tank of Volume = 4.19 Cubic meter which is filled with water. I want to empty the tank by giving a HP air blow at 10 Bar. How much air is required to empty the tank completely.
    If someone can give any formula or any reference that can help me.

    Senario-2

    I have a tank of Volume = 4.19 Cubic meter which is filled with water and the tank is dipped in water at a depth of 5 meter depth. I want to empty the tank by giving a HP air blow at 10 Bar. How much air is required to empty the tank completely.

    If someone can give any formula or any reference that can help me.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 14, 2009 #2
    Scenario 1.
    Don't understand.
    scenario 2
    1 bar = 10 meters of water, so you will need 0.5 bar (1.5 bar absolute) to empty the tank. Your air source is 10 bar (11 bar absolute) so your air supply wil expand by 11/1.5 = 7.33. Your water tank is 4.19 cubic meter, so you will need 4.19/7.33 = 0.57 cubic meters of air at 10 bar (11 bar absolute).
     
  4. Jun 18, 2009 #3
    You simply need the volume of air to fill the tank at the pressure you are displacing the water to.

    So for a 4.19 cubic meters of water at 1 bar is displaced by 4.19 cubic meters of air at 1bar. Now if the water is being displaced to a higher height than the bottom of the tank, or at a higher pressure then you need to account for the difference.

    Now what I mentioned is the truth from a physics standpoint. From an engineering standpoint you are not going to get the tank empty with the volume of air required to empty it because the air will tunnel out to the drain at the bottom causing the water to start spraying at the end instead of a solid stream. If you want to get an idea of how much air you are going to need to run some sort of fluid simulations taking into account the size and shape of your tank as well as the way you introduce the air to blow the tanks. Alternatively you can just live with a small amount of water in the bottom and blow the tanks slowly.
     
  5. Jun 18, 2009 #4
     
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