Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Hubble Infrared Ultra Deep Field clearly reveals deep cosmic background

  1. Nov 26, 2006 #1
    [Moderator's note: This posting seems a bit chaotic, sorry, and
    probably off-topic. LM]

    Hubble Infrared Ultra Deep Field clearly reveals deep cosmic background
    fractile 3D mesh of H filaments lit by hypernovae: Murray 2006.11.21

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AstroDeep/20
    http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2004/07/image/b/
    http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/2004/07/images/b/formats/full_tif.tif
    7.34 MB tiff


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rmforall/ to access 38 astrophotos

    #33. Hubble Ultra Deep Field infrared view,
    brightness +20, and both red and blue colors increased,
    and green reduced, softness set to 3 of 12 levels, 4.07 MB png,
    1600X1600 pixels. 4.07 MB png

    The colors have been adjusted to reveal a few faint distant red
    sources, as well as a background of tiny blue sources, 1-2 pixel size,
    which are always on the background of dark tangled Murray mesh.
    Click on All Sizes to view the Original.

    static.flickr.com/42/121113050_6b7c705fcb_o.png

    The number of the myriad minute blue sources varies noticeably,
    for instance,from higher south of the bright foreground star,
    just left of center at the bottom, to lower towards the lower right.
    This indicates that simple surveys can collect much detailed
    information. (Use the All Sizes button and select Original.)

    The value of this simple approach is evident,
    if we take the tiny blue sources to be
    the earliest massive hypernovae and GRBs,
    markers that highlight the 3D fractile network distribution of mostly H
    gas filaments, condensing by gravitational attraction,
    as the universe bubble continued its expansion.
    It became cool enough at 380,000 years to allow atoms to form within
    the former ionized plasma.
    Transparency emerged from opacity.
    The intense ultraviolet radiation at 3,000 deg K was redshifted and
    cooled with the thousand-fold expansion of space-time to
    comprise our era's Cosmic Microwave Background at just 2.7 deg K,
    ubiquitious, and uniform to a few parts in a hundred thousand.

    See for yourself, Observer,
    the deep tapestry of our astrophysical history,
    hung hugely against the uniform red background
    (downshifted cosmic ultraviolet),
    the wooly open knit of cooled and condensed H filaments
    (darkly silhouetting the background),
    lit like Christmas trees with generations of tiny blue sources,
    (the downshifted ultraviolet of immense fast-burning, short-lived
    hypernovae,
    and a few GRBs,
    while some twin sources may be the two jet lobes of active galaxies),
    with vistas of closer and cooler galaxies,
    ranging from red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and white,
    from early small clump cluster galaxies to far larger irregular,
    spiral, and elliptical galaxies,
    and the little kid in our own neighborhood,
    the red foreground star with its diffraction spikes
    from the Hubble Space Telescope,
    just left of center at the bottom.

    I used an excellent low cost image processing program,
    MGI PhotoSuite 4.0,
    to adjust the colors to bring out the (subtle background details:
    Touchup feature:
    Soften: set at 3 of 12 levels, to slightly smooth out the pixels.
    Color Adjustment: Cyan-Red +75, Magenta-Green -100, Yellow-Blue +50,
    as empirically this created a pleasing, easy to view image with maximum
    detail.
    Brightness: increased from 0 to 20, to increase the dark background
    details.
    Gamma: unchanged at 1.00.


    #34. HUDF ir 1/4 area in low center,
    800X800 pixels. 1.02 MB png

    static.flickr.com/52/121113051_12b5e3b85c_o.png


    #35. HUDF ir 1/16 area in low center,
    400X400 pixels. 263 KB png

    static.flickr.com/49/121113052_52157a78ca_o.png


    #36. HUDF ir closer view. 180 KB png about 60 arc-sec wide

    static.flickr.com/53/121150408_69845a7c53_o.png


    #37. HUDF ir closer view, to show levels of background structure:
    distant red glow,
    dark 3D fractile mesh that obscures the background red glow,
    blue sources that light up the dark mesh of condensing H and He gas,
    a few much closer red, white, and blue sources.
    Click on All Sizes button for closeup.

    static.flickr.com/44/121150409_efdb07b94d_o.png



    #38. HUDF ir deepest view -- click on All Sizes button.
    RTM-1 is the reddish feature that slants down to the lower right from
    the center towards the bright galaxy -- not visible are the bright
    objects at both ends of RTM-1, which may be a central ir source with
    bipolar jets, seen from the side, that end quickly in a pair of big
    expanded hot gas regions, very bright in the other HUDF
    visible bands of light. See #31.

    static.flickr.com/50/121150410_d95548c86f_o.png



    # 19 The Millennium Simulation, announced 2005.06.02 by the Virgo
    consortium,
    used the largest supercomputer in Europe,
    at the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory,
    for over a month to model the history of the Universe
    in a cube over 2 billion light years on a side,
    holding 20 million galaxies.

    static.flickr.com/13/18135102_07a58fd89d_o.jpg

    This image is a closeup of the results at redshift z = 0, showing a 15
    MPC/h thick slice, showing the visible light distribution,
    which closely follows the mass distribution.
    The view is four times wider than in #18,
    so that the width of the image is 1628 MLy.
    The length of the central large and dense galaxy cluster
    is about 60 MLy.

    1024 X 768 pixels jpg 0.970950 MB

    The distance measure Mpc/h has been used for decades to adjust to the
    fact that the Hubble constant = H has not been exactly determined.
    Mpc is megaparsecs.
    A parsec is 3.26 light years.
    The Millennium Simulation used the value 0.73
    for the Hubble constant H.

    To get the distance in Mpc,
    we multiply their value by 100/H = 100/0.73 = 1.37 .

    The huge, densely packed galaxy cluster,
    holding thousands of galaxies,
    for the greenish central region, has a length of about 60 MLy.
    In contrast, the nearest large neighbor to our Milky Way galaxy is
    Andromeda galaxy at 2.2 MLy distance.

    The distribution of mass in the Universe is very fractile --
    it looks just as complex and very much the same
    at a very wide range of distance scales.

    So, even though I do not know how wide this image would be in terms of
    angular measures (degrees, minutes, seconds),
    it is probably justified to compare it to the Capodimonte Deep Field
    subtle background visible light images.

    Many features are the same:
    complex 3D fractile network,
    with bright boundaries around both brighter (more dense) and dimmer
    (more empty) regions,
    and both brighter and thicker and thinner and dimmer lines,
    marked by myriad tiny dense features.
    I don't believe that the MS image includes gravitational lensing, which
    must be a complex factor in the CDF images.

    Click on All Sizes to view Original.

    www.pparc.ac.uk/Nw/millennium_sim.asp The Virgo consortium

    www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/galform/millennium/

    www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/galform/millennium/galseq_D_063.jpg

    arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0504097
    Simulating the joint evolution of quasars, galaxies and their
    large-scale distribution

    pil.phys.uniroma1.it/debate3.html
    On the fractile structure of the universe
    Sylos Labini, Montuori & Pietronero


    #24 (#30) field from Hubble Ultra Deep Field 832 X 833 p tif 2.72 MB
    png 1.86 MB
    This field is 61 sec wide = 1 minute wide.
    RTM-1 is a pair of double blue spots just above the large magenta
    galaxy in the lower left.
    There are six more similar blue spot pairs in this field.

    static.flickr.com/13/19717874_18d6b931b4_o.png

    RTM-1, closeup view in #21, is very like CSL-1,
    only blue and more separated,
    but with the similar equality of size and color.
    It turns out that there are so many easily found pairs of all sizes,
    down to single pixel bright spots separated by a pixel space,
    that statistical studies are appropriate.
    Views # 20 to 29 will explore the HUDF, and provide many helpful links.

    The colors have been adjusted to reveal a few faint distant red
    sources, as well as a background of tiny blue sources, 1-2 pixel size,
    which are always on the background of dark tangled Murray mesh --
    easier to see at first behind the red light scattered inside the Hubble
    Space Telescope by the much nearer bright star, and also behind the
    large blue white galaxy in the upper right. Click on All Sizes to view
    the Original.

    I used an excellent low cost image processing program, MGI PhotoSuite
    4.0, to adjust the colors to bring out the subtle background details:
    Touchup feature:
    Soften: reduced from 3 to 0, as I wanted to maximize the raw detail.
    Color Adjustment: Cyan-Red +100, Magenta-Green +25, Yellow-Blue +50,
    as empirically this created a pleasing, easy to view image with maximum
    detail.
    Brightness: increased from 0 to 50, to increase the dark background
    details.
    Gamma: reduced from 1.00 to 0.80, to increase the dark background
    details.
    Fix Colors: Hue: shifted 0 to -60,
    to accentuate the background of myriad minute bright blue sources
    without losing information from the red end of the spectrum.

    www.aip.de/groups/galaxies/sw/udf/index.php# The UDF Skywalker allows
    you to scan the entire HUDF with a movable magnifying glass that shows
    about this scale of detail. You can discern Murray mesh with it.
    ************************************************************************

    Rich Murray, MA Room For All rmforall@comcast.net
    505-501-2298 1943 Otowi Road Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rmforall/messages

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AstroDeep/messages

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/aspartameNM/messages
    group with 78 members, 1,381 posts in a public, searchable archive
    http://RMForAll.blogspot.com
    ************************************************************************
     
  2. jcsd
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Can you help with the solution or looking for help too?
Draft saved Draft deleted