Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Human Resource pre-hiring tests

  1. Sep 13, 2010 #1
    How many of you have ever been excluded from a position because the company made all applicants take the myers-briggs or a compentency skills assesment?

    Just wondering, because in my software life I got alot of consulting work because companies could not hire the talent to do development projects. And it was because the intense developers didn't fit the corporate culture.

    I am taking some HR courses as part of my endless quest for knowledge and unlimited funds to go school until i get a Degree. And I am doing a course on this stuff and I just did a paper slamming these tests. Was that the assignment? Nope. It was to illustrate how useful they were, but you say tomato and tomatoe.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 13, 2010 #2

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    At one of my jobs, we were all given the option to take the Meyers-Briggs, but we were all permanent employees who had been there a while. I thought it was helpful.

    Btw, there was a thread in General Discussion not long ago about the test. I'll find the link...

    Here it is...

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=281171
     
  4. Sep 13, 2010 #3
    Thanks, I should have searched.

    What did they use if for? Career development or to identify training needs? Do you know the reason? ( And thanks, this sort of feedback will help me with my course ).
     
  5. Sep 13, 2010 #4

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Hmm...well if I remember, they said it's to help understand our coworkers. And to be honest, it did help. I thought some people were dour and quiet because they were kind of @ssholes but no, it was just their temperament.

    I thought it odd that so many PFers scored INTJ, it's not a common type.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook