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Husband problem

  1. Oct 12, 2007 #1
    I want to talk to my husband about math. How can I trick him in to learning calculus?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 12, 2007 #2

    Kurdt

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    You can talk about it enthusiastically and hope he catches the bug and does a course. If he gets annoyed at you talking about maths all the time then perhaps you could get a new one? :tongue2:

    Failing that the old asking him up front about calculus and if he could ever love it might work and save all the hassle.
     
  4. Oct 12, 2007 #3

    Math Is Hard

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    He might enjoy reading "A Tour of the Calculus" and be inspired to learn more.
     
  5. Oct 12, 2007 #4
    No, I like the one I have. Just trying to upgrade a bit.

    That's not such a bad idea, I think I have that book...

    But I'm really looking for a TRICK.

    He's pretty smart and even likes using excel and access just for fun. He's an urban planner, so its not like he's number-phobic. Just math-phobic.
     
  6. Oct 12, 2007 #5

    Gokul43201

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    Ask him for the remainder when 512 is divided by 13, and point to the calculator that you've discreetly placed in his vicinity. As he reaches for it, you mumble some barely audible, ruminating-like sounds and casually say, "Oh, never mind honey, it's just 1." He will naturally be zapped and beseech you to reveal the secret of your magical prowess. That's your opportunity to add "It's just calculus, darling!"

    Of course, a couple months later, when he's just getting past differential forms and suddenly remembers where this all started, he's bound to call your bluff. At this point, you respond, "Did I say "calculus"? I'm so sorry sweetheart...I meant 'topology'".

    :biggrin:
     
  7. Oct 12, 2007 #6
    maybe get him interested in physics or a subject that would make him want to learn calculus first?

    I took only basic math in high-school and dropped my math classes during the last year. I didn't even take trig... I don't remember ever seeing functions either.

    what convinced me to start learning more calculus and math is that I got really interested in physics, and pop-science books felt like they were missing something, like watching someone else play a really cool videogame but never getting a turn to play myself... just wanting to understand more of a subject he enjoys might give him the drive to want to be able to understand that subject down to its core.

    few people would want to jump into math if they are not forced to (sorry guys; it's true. don't shoot the messenger o:) ). on the other hand, most people find physics interesting. if you tickle his curiosity with a concept like "O, I'd explain more... but you'd have to understand what a limit is for that to make any sense," he might feel left out and actually want to look into it.

    EDIT: haha or you could just try it gokul's way :rofl:.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2007
  8. Oct 13, 2007 #7

    berkeman

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    There goes Gokul, showing off again :rolleyes: :rofl: :approve:


    Okay, here you go. One of the most useful and practical applications of basic differential calculus is optimization, right? Maxima, minima, etc. And the best Urban Planners would understand the math and reasoning behind optimization, because it is directly applicable to their daily work. The BEST Urban Planners in the nation understand and apply basic differential calculus every day in their work.

    Does that sound like a useful trick? :biggrin:
     
  9. Oct 13, 2007 #8
    o00ops ..calculus with him ...seems dangerous things to do :)

    (::


    ok ...just u have to try !
     
  10. Oct 13, 2007 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    No math, no sex. No trick needed [so to speak].
     
  11. Oct 13, 2007 #10

    Chronos

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    Try auctioning him off on ebay as a math wonk and show him the bids. . . .
     
  12. Oct 13, 2007 #11

    radou

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    Sth like that, yes. And before sex, he should do a few proofs first.
     
  13. Oct 13, 2007 #12
    At least not until he understands what [tex]\int_{10}^{13}{2xdx}?[/tex] means, or [tex]\int{e^x} = e^x + C[/tex].
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2007
  14. Oct 13, 2007 #13
    Are you learning urban planning?
     
  15. Oct 13, 2007 #14

    robphy

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    http://faculty.nhmccd.edu/hfar/Numerical Calculus with Excel.pdf (too obvious?)
    http://mathforum.org/mathtools/discuss.html?context=all&do=r&msg=_____ra-27 "Kissing is the secret of calculus"
    http://www.illuminatingscience.org/bikini-calculus/ (maybe not a good idea)
    http://www.amazon.com/Calculus-Wars-Leibniz-Greatest-Mathematical/dp/1560257067 (a book on the Newton vs Leibniz story)

    Probably the best way to encourage the learning of something like calculus is to effectively pose a problem of interest that requires it. That's how I learned computer programming: for example, since I had to process a lot of text, I forced myself to learn some perl to get the job done. berkeman's suggestion of an optimization problem might be a good approach.
     
  16. Oct 13, 2007 #15
    Well I helped write some scripts for his database once. Oh and I've read Jane Jacobs!
     
  17. Oct 13, 2007 #16

    EnumaElish

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    If he's an urban planner, he must be familiar with at least some economics concepts; e.g. cost-benefit analysis. Even if he is not, that may be a good place to start because hopefully he can relate these concepts to his work. If he is already familiar with some of these, then nudge him toward microeconomics. "Honey, why is it that shops/stores/gas stations/etc. tend to be closely concentrated at a few locations through the city? I heard that's how they maximize their profits."
     
  18. Oct 13, 2007 #17

    morphism

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    Hahahaha! Brilliant!
     
  19. Oct 14, 2007 #18
    Right, but in this day and age, computers (or graphing calculators) can easily plot functions, allowing the maxima and minima to be found easily without the use of calculus. However, there are of course many other practical applications of calculus not pertaining to optimization.
     
  20. Oct 14, 2007 #19

    Gib Z

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    I could have sworn Euler's Theorem was number theory :( (I haven't learned topology, but I have learned Euler's theorem ..)


    I suddenly have a new appreciation for the constant rule (even though they kind of got it wrong..)
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2007
  21. Oct 14, 2007 #20

    morphism

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    I think that was Gokul's point.
     
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