Hybridization of sulfur

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Qube
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Hybridization of carbon

Pretty sure my professor is wrong once again.

me8y6yge.jpg


SO2 should have two double bonds which gives the sulfur a minimal formal charge and two signs bonds. The two sigma bonds imply sp hybridization, not the blatantly wrong circled answer.
 
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  • #2
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Pretty sure my professor is wrong once again.

me8y6yge.jpg


SO2 should have two double bonds which gives the sulfur a minimal formal charge and two signs bonds. The two sigma bonds imply sp hybridization, not the blatantly wrong circled answer.
How many valence electrons does sulfur has? What is the structure of SO2?

The attached question is about C2H2, but the circled answer is wrong. The hybridisation is sp for carbon in C2H2.
 
  • #3
SteamKing
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It's fortunate that your professor has you around to keep him straight.
 
  • #4
DrDu
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I am quite tired of repeating here in the forum that atoms don't "have" a certain hybridization in a given molecule over and over.
Acetylene can perfectly well be described both in terms of sp and sp3 hybrids. In the latter case, the bonds are called descriptively "banana bonds". The energetic difference is usually minute between alternative hybridization schemes in valence bond theory and can only be evaluated using dedicated VB programs.
In the case of SO2, it is not even necessary to involve hybridization: The bonds to the two oxygens can be explained using two of the p orbitals of sulphur alone.
 
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Qube
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How many valence electrons does sulfur has? What is the structure of SO2?

The attached question is about C2H2, but the circled answer is wrong. The hybridisation is sp for carbon in C2H2.
Whoops, I was thinking of another question. Yes, the circled answer is still wrong since in the case of the hydrocarbon in the picture the carbon has a hybridization of sp2; there are two bonds with hydrogen and one triple bond between the carbons, giving us a total of 3 sigma bonds.
 
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Qube
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It's fortunate that your professor has you around to keep him straight.
I won't be having him around any longer; I think his job security is decreasing by the day (answer?)
 
  • #7
Qube
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I am quite tired of repeating here in the forum that atoms don't "have" a certain hybridization in a given molecule over and over.
Acetylene can perfectly well be described both in terms of sp and sp3 hybrids. In the latter case, the bonds are called descriptively "banana bonds". The energetic difference is usually minute between alternative hybridization schemes in valence bond theory and can only be evaluated using dedicated VB programs.
In the case of SO2, it is not even necessary to involve hybridization: The bonds to the two oxygens can be explained using two of the p orbitals of sulphur alone.
You lost me at banana bond.

I do understand that hybridization is a model for explaining phenomenon such as the fact carbon forms four bonds instead of two, and that models don't always translate perfectly to the real world, just as the Bohr atom model is still used to explain things even though the model is overly simplistic (or simply incorrect).
 
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dextercioby
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Whoops, I was thinking of another question. Yes, the circled answer is still wrong since in the case of the hydrocarbon in the picture the carbon has a hybridization of sp2; there are two bonds with hydrogen and one triple bond between the carbons, giving us a total of 3 sigma bonds.
Take it easy. in C2H2, the hybridization of C is sp, The molecule is linear (no free electrons) and between the 2 C atoms there's a triple bond.
 
  • #9
Qube
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Take it easy. in C2H2, the hybridization of C is sp, The molecule is linear (no free electrons) and between the 2 C atoms there's a triple bond.
You're right sorry I keep thinking of C2H4.
 

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