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Hydrogen combustion engines?

  1. Apr 8, 2005 #1

    Pengwuino

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    I was reading an article and they were talken about this new hydrogen hummer that will be powered by hydrogen. But it was a hydrogen combustion engine instead of a hydrogen electric vehicle. How does the combustion engine work? I thought hydrogen doesnt have that really quick explosive characteristic that gasoline does.
     
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  3. Apr 8, 2005 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was looking for a good link [that I thought I had] that discusses the practical engineering aspects of this which seem to be fairly well understood now, but in the mean time, this popped up:

    http://www.h2cars.biz/artman/publish/article_676.shtml
     
  4. Apr 8, 2005 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    Also
    http://www.h2cars.biz/artman/publish/article_648.shtml
     
  5. Apr 8, 2005 #4

    Cliff_J

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    It does have different properties than gasoline but they can be used to an advantage too since some of the properties offer the ability to optimize the engine for higher efficiency. In short, add H2 to a regular engine optimized for gasoline and it has roughly a 15% loss in power potential. Optimize the same engine displacement for H2 and now its a 15% advantage to use H2 over gasoline but now the engine would need special provisions to run regular gasoline.

    One place of many doing this has put some of their stuff online, interesting if they can bring it to market:
    http://www.unitednuclear.com/h2.htm
     
  6. Apr 9, 2005 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    http://avt.inel.gov/hydrogen.shtml
     
  7. Apr 9, 2005 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    From Cliff's link:
     
  8. Apr 9, 2005 #7
  9. Apr 9, 2005 #8

    Pengwuino

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    *drooooools*
     
  10. Apr 10, 2005 #9
    There is one thing that puzzles me about using 'hydride' storage for Hydrogen. That is, that this method has been known and apparently generating controversy for at least twenty five years. Is there anything new on it that would render the idea more practical Today? Has it simply been blocked by the petroleum industry? What is it's practical status?

    KM
     
  11. Apr 10, 2005 #10

    Pengwuino

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    Theres a lot of practical problems and i believe therhe are new developments. But of course, refining them into usable cost effective means takes many years. Petroleum industry is rather incapable of holding back new technologies in the end just like most industries.
     
  12. Apr 10, 2005 #11

    Cliff_J

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    Biggest problem I'd seen is that the hydrides cannot handle expose to oxygen, so its a bit of a fragile storage medium that would be easy to render completely useless for H2 storage. The united nuclear website at one point had a description of the filling process where the lines, pump, and all fittings needed to be flushed with argon to avoid contamination from regular atmospheric air.

    Hmm maybe some special membrane that only allows passage of H2 while blocking the larger molecules, the H2 filling filter? Apply a vacum to the lines and fittings from the filling station to remove most atmospheric oxygen? Still sounds a little impractical but could be workable.
     
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