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Hypanthodium inflorescence

  1. Jun 26, 2015 #1
    hypanthodium inflorescence is different from capitulum in
    And the answer is
    Absence of protandrous condition.
    Can anyone explain this ?how?
    I know protandrous condition is having the male reproductive organs come to maturity before the female.
    according to this
    http://www.sakshieducation.com/(S(2iwaqj3wm3ymsemwhqzaud55))/Inter(New)/..\EAMCET\QR\Botany\jr_botanysynopsis\07Inflorescence.pdf
    see the last line of last page
    It says
    "The opening of flowers in Hypanthodium contains no definite order"
    does the term" opening of flowers" indicate maturity here?
    If yes then the answer "Absence of protandrous condition" makes sense to me .
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 26, 2015 #2

    jim mcnamara

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    Staff: Mentor

    It refers to the development of the anthers on a flower by flower basis.

    If you notice carefully both determinate and indeterminate inflorscences of most all plant species with inforescences have "baby" flowers and more mature flowers at the same time. Think of a hypanthodium as having three types of flowers: mature male dominant in a ring at the mouth of the bowl - less mature female dominant flowers in a ring in the middle, and immature female dominant at the bottom of the bowl. The genus Ficus (Fig) is an example. -- this structure is an adaptation for insect pollination.

    As an aside - unless you want to be a Botanist, learning all the botanical terms is very long term endeavor because the terminology is truly vast. Stuff like extrorse and antrorse viscid trichomes litter the botano-linguistic landscape. There are lots of one-off kinds of structures common to a single plant family or even a genus. This generates LOTS of terms. My undergrad Botany mentor claimed there were about 120K unique terms just for angiosperms. Back then Mycology and Phycology were sub-discplines of Botany. They each added gobs of terms on their own.

    I like the subject, so it was fun. Just go at it slowly and realize that you may never see hypanthodium again unless you teach Botany. Or eat figs at a dinner party and want to show off. Or answer questions on PF.

    FWIW the link you showed is spelling challenged -- ex. pedicel is not spelled correctly.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2015
  4. Jun 27, 2015 #3
    Here "it "means ?Are you referring to "The opening of flowers"?
     
  5. Jun 27, 2015 #4

    jim mcnamara

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes. the correct term is anthesis. That 'means beginning of flowering' <- in the context I used.
     
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