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I found a lepton mass ratio formula:

  1. Jul 25, 2004 #1

    Hans de Vries

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    I found the following (for what it’s worth):

    ln(mu/me) / (2pi-3/pi) = 1.000627
    ln(mt/me) / (3pi-4/pi) = 1.00031

    me = 0.51099892 MeV (+/-0.00000004)
    mu = 105.658369 MeV (+/-0.000009)
    mt = 1776.99000 MeV (+0.29 -0.26)

    I've not seen it before. There's no theory behind it.
    I was trying one, made a bug and stumbled on it.

    Regards, Hans
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 25, 2004 #2
    Nice. I'm really in to Leptons. I like this post. :biggrin:

    What exactly do you mean by me, mu, and mt?

    Do you mean [itex]\nu_e[/itex], [itex]\nu_\mu[/itex], and [itex]\nu_\tau[/itex] for electron neutrino, muon neutrino, and tau neutrino respectively?
     
  4. Jul 25, 2004 #3

    Hans de Vries

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    It relates the masses of the electron, the muon and the tau lepton.

    ln(mu/me) is the natural logarithm of the ratio between the muon mass
    and the electron mass. The value 2pi-3/pi describes it with an accuracy
    of 0.06% The other one is twice as exact.

    Regards, Hans de Vries
     
  5. Jul 25, 2004 #4
    Anything with neutrinos and their mass ratios?
     
  6. Jul 26, 2004 #5

    Hans de Vries

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    Unfortunately. there's not enough know about the neutriono masses.
    For decades (until recently) it was believed that they had no mass at all.
    This is what is known about the upper mass limits:

    ve Mass < 3 eV
    vu mass < 0.19 MeV
    vt mass < 18.2 MeV


    Regards, Hans
     
  7. Jul 27, 2004 #6

    Hans de Vries

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  8. Aug 3, 2004 #7

    arivero

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    it is really intriguing.
    I wonder if it applies to quarks to, perhaps changing -1/pi -> +1/pi, or directly.
     
  9. Aug 3, 2004 #8

    Chronos

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    For even more fun, try adding up the quark mass and see if it equals the proton mass.
     
  10. Aug 3, 2004 #9

    arivero

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    Chronos, for sure it does not. You must account also the energy of force carriers, which form a glueball.
     
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