I hate it when people prounce ln as lawn

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  • #26
Math Is Hard
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iNCREDiBLE said:
Well... Here in Sweden "root of two" implicitly means "square root of two" since square root is the most ordinary root.
Heck, they didn't even say "root of two" as you Swedes do - just "root two"!
 
  • #27
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Yesterday our lecturer pronounced Galois as GAL-WAH, is that how it's meant to be said?
 
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gazzo said:
Yesterday our lecturer pronounced Galois as GAL-WAH, is that how it's meant to be said?

Yes. Take a look at http://www.answers.com/topic/galois-theory". You can even click on the sound button to hear how it's pronounced.
 
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  • #29
Gokul43201
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gazzo said:
Yesterday our lecturer pronounced Galois as GAL-WAH, is that how it's meant to be said?
Don't have sound on this computer...I'd say it's more like GAHL-wah.
 
  • #30
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gazzo said:
Yesterday our lecturer pronounced Galois as GAL-WAH, is that how it's meant to be said?

Yes, it's how you pronounce it. Gah-loo-ah.

French high schoolers in Canada pronounce "ln" as "el-en", where "en" is similar to "end" and not "english". This was quite confusing when I started university, since I was the only one saying "el-en", which other students pronounced as "lawn"; and worse, the professor preferred "log" to either. It's hard to keep track of them sometimes.

What's the exact pronounciation of "Cauchy"? One of my professors says "Coo-shee", another says "Cow-shee"; "Coo-chee" and "Cow-chee" were floating around, too.
 
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  • #31
Diane_
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Now I'm feeling all guilty. "ln" is "lin" to me, and that's what I've been doing to my students for - uhh - fifteen years or so.

But I pronounce Euler and Cauchy correctly, so that's two out of three! Which is a D+, now that I think about it...
 
  • #32
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Diane_ said:
Now I'm feeling all guilty. "ln" is "lin" to me, and that's what I've been doing to my students for - uhh - fifteen years or so.
But I pronounce Euler and Cauchy correctly, so that's two out of three! Which is a D+, now that I think about it...
No worries, Diane. We grade on a curve. :biggrin:
 
  • #33
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pronouncing sinh as "shine", tanh as "than", and sech as "sheck" always make me chuckle.

Saying ln as "log" seems a lot less confuzzling
 
  • #34
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gazzo said:
pronouncing sinh as "shine", tanh as "than", and sech as "sheck" always make me chuckle.

Saying ln as "log" seems a lot less confuzzling
Shouldn't tanh be "tansh"?

Regardless, I always seem to pronounce it "tan etch" for some reason. :yuck:
 
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Icebreaker said:
Yes, it's how you pronounce it. Gah-loo-ah.
French high schoolers in Canada pronounce "ln" as "el-en", where "en" is similar to "end" and not "english". This was quite confusing when I started university, since I was the only one saying "el-en", which other students pronounced as "lawn"; and worse, the professor preferred "log" to either. It's hard to keep track of them sometimes.
What's the exact pronounciation of "Cauchy"? One of my professors says "Coo-shee", another says "Cow-shee"; "Coo-chee" and "Cow-chee" were floating around, too.

http://www.answers.com/Cauchy" [Broken] (scroll down a bit)
 
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