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I hate scientist

  1. Dec 21, 2007 #1

    wolram

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    Because when they are right they right, but when they are wrong they are right because they followed the scientific method.
    Apart from that i think you scientist are worth the money.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 21, 2007 #2
    No, the result is still factually incorrect. Also, there isn't really anything called "The Scientific Method" because it is actually a collection of similar methods.

    Guess what separates us from the Dark Ages? I'll give you a hint; it starts with s :uhh:
     
  4. Dec 21, 2007 #3

    EnumaElish

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    No, scientists are worth more.

    Ask anyone which ideas started the modern age; very few people will give you the right answer: physics (Sir Isaac et al.)

    Even fewer people will say that it was Einstein et al. who revolutionarized the 20th century much more fundamentally than the usual suspects (the plethora of philosophical / political figures).
     
  5. Dec 21, 2007 #4
    I can't think what influence Einstein had outside the scientific community. A lot of people think he invented the atomic bomb, but he didn't. Is there some other influence he had? In my opinion, the most influential person of the 20th century was Vladimir Lenin. If you want to limit it to scientists, I would say Lise Meitner.
     
  6. Dec 21, 2007 #5

    EnumaElish

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    Every other issue of popular science magazines has an article about Einstein and time travel.

    Just think of the jokes/talk about time being relative.

    What did Lenin et al. do? They discovered the long, painful way from capitalism to capitalism.

    Not many people can describe time dilution, but I think every college graduate and probably anyone who watches TV is aware that the old notion of time has been discarded. Now that's a revolution.
     
  7. Dec 21, 2007 #6
    Let's face it, scientists are literally (no pun intended) the new prophets of the world, ushering us into the future.
     
  8. Dec 21, 2007 #7

    mheslep

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    marshall

    I'd call him the man most responsible for the US creation of the bomb in WWII, in the sense of if you take this single person away how does history change. I base this on the letter with Szilard to Roosevelt. Without Einstein's reputation behind it that letter it goes into the trash, and the $4B never gets spent on Manhattan. That, on top of E=MC^2 which showed theoretically what was possible.

    If you are speaking to the influence of ideas, one must prefer Marx to Lenin, Lenin being more of an implementor. If instead you mean implementors, then I think one must prefer Mao who dwarfed Lenin in numbers of people over whose lives he changed (and killed).

    However, after the fall of the Berlin wall I think clearly democracy is clearly the most dominant political idea in the 20th century. And of the subject of economic ideas, the changes in China in the 80's/90's and later in India show free market Capitalism to be the most influential economic idea. Not sure to which 20th century individual one would give credit for these changes. Suggestions: George Marshall/R. "tear down this wall" Reagan/Gorbachev/Friedman

    Her fission discovery was great, but I sense listing her as 20th century top scientist is a bit of compensation for the terrible injustice done to her by the Nobel oversight.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2007
  9. Dec 21, 2007 #8

    mheslep

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    Thats hardly a given. It is Ill grant common to be taken up in the fascination with scientific discovery. Feynman, my own personal favorite scientist, said:
    I think that is at least naive, probably foolish even, to discount the elimination of one human enslaving another regardless of how far one looks to into the future. No, I'd say its a toss up between modern science and political ideas with respect to the impact on people's lives. I give the nod to political ideas.[/QUOTE]
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2007
  10. Dec 21, 2007 #9
    Ideas? Yes, but not when it comes to the actual professions. I'd tend to say that politicians are generally considered dishonest. Scientists? Not so much, at least not on a general basis. Or is it just me?
     
  11. Dec 21, 2007 #10
    19th century.

    Without Lenin there is no Mao. Without the letter you still get a bomb.

    Not the top scientist, just the most influential one. Actually, I would rather cite Shockley, Bardeen, and Brattain, but I don't know if they count as scientists.
     
  12. Dec 21, 2007 #11

    Evo

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    What exactly is a political idea?
     
  13. Dec 21, 2007 #12

    mheslep

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    Yep. Ok Lenin.


    Nah, I think no Lenin delays the creation of a Mao perhaps.
    Still get a bomb? Eventually, sure, but it may have taken a long time. Consider: no Einstein and there's likely no Manhattan project, and WWII ends w/out the bomb. Recall that prior to WWII science was nickels and dimes, and after it became big business, something that is oft taken for granted today. The budgets of U. physics departments went up 100x-1000x (Bethe at Cornell for instance) for physicists returning after the war. No big dollars, no weapon's grade enrichment.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2007
  14. Dec 21, 2007 #13

    mheslep

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    Well in the context of the Feynman quote above I mean:
    Political Idea: Human chattel slavery
    Scientific Idea: Maxwell's EM equations.
     
  15. Dec 21, 2007 #14

    Evo

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    I think Wolram's talking more about a layman's view of the world. :smile:
     
  16. Dec 21, 2007 #15

    Danger

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    There's money in this? Hell of a time to tell me. :grumpy:
     
  17. Dec 21, 2007 #16
    Scientists are not worth the money they get - they are worth more, especially with the massive cutbacks in the states.
     
  18. Dec 21, 2007 #17

    mheslep

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    Good one. Add Kilby and you might have me on board.

    That prompts a more general question about my Einstein promotion: The bomb aside, what's the impact to 20th century technology in the sense of impact on daily life if there is no discovery of special/general relativity, no mass energy equivalence? Even if one takes away nuclear power (not necessary really) we still get by. In particular, if science was still fumbling around trying to detect the aether, so what? There's some stars a few arc seconds away from where Newton says they should be, so what? Does no-relativity break, say, GPS?
     
  19. Dec 21, 2007 #18

    Danger

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    Relativity aside, where would our electronics industry be if nobody had discovered the photoelectric effect (for which Einstein won his Emmy... no, sorry, Nobel... I watch too much TV :redface:)?
     
  20. Dec 21, 2007 #19

    jcsd

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    Teh Scienist is teh suxxor!!1!!!1 K ThKx Bai!1!!!1!
     
  21. Dec 21, 2007 #20

    Evo

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    :rofl: :rofl:
     
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