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I have found a fossil. Help ID

  1. Jun 25, 2011 #1
    Hello everyone!
    The fossil was found on a beach in Victoria, Australia.
    I have no idea what it is or how old, so if someone has an idea, lets hear it.
    It "looks" like jaw/teeth. Also the teeth "look" carnivorous.
    Cheers!

    .......trying to upload pics, but none of the icons work.....
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 25, 2011 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    While editing post go to advanced mode, look for Managing attachments buttons below edit box.
     
  4. Jun 25, 2011 #3
    Thanks for the help, but i click on 'edit' post i dont see any option for 'advanced mode'
     
  5. Jun 25, 2011 #4

    HallsofIvy

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    The button says "Go Advanced".
     
  6. Jun 25, 2011 #5

    Evo

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    Are you trying to attach a picture, as in upload it to the PF server, or link to a picture hosted elsewhere? The Icon that looks like a picture frame that says "insert image" is only for linking to a picture. To attach an image, you must scroll down to "Additional options", under "attach files", select "manage attachments", then follow instructions.

    If you can't find the "Go Advanced" button next to the "Save" button, then just start a new thread and follow my instructions for the picture option you need.
     
  7. Jun 25, 2011 #6
    The problem was none of the icons/buttons/fonts settings would do anything when clicked on.
    However the problem has righted itself, so the website or my pc was having s*** fit at the time.
     
  8. Jun 25, 2011 #7

    Evo

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    So, will you be posting pictures?
     
  9. Jun 25, 2011 #8
    Ok here we go.......
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Jun 25, 2011 #9
    another to judge the size
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Jun 25, 2011 #10

    Evo

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    Teeth!! Did I guess correctly?

    Seriously, nice set, where did you find them? I'm guessing you chipped the rock out between them?
     
  12. Jun 25, 2011 #11
    You sure did, well I'm pretty sure it is....
    Nope haven't done anything to it. Found washed up on the beach, as is, In Venus Bay, Victoria, Australia.
    Any clue on what it is?
     
  13. Jun 26, 2011 #12
    The question is relayed to an expert.
     
  14. Jun 26, 2011 #13

    Borek

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    No idea what it could be, but shape of teeth and their placement is always a very characteristic feature - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dentition#Dental_formula


    [armchair analysis]
    I hope Andre's expert will tell us more - the way I see it incisors are not present (most likely destroyed), then there are fangs - and then each half of the jaw looks different, even if they should be identical. Could be this particular specimen ignored his dentist for too long. I have a feeling molars looks wide, as if they were used for chewing and grinding, predators molars are more narrow as they are used as scissors. So it was either herbivore or omnivore. That's mostly speculation, but I would love to know how close/far I was :smile:
    [/armchair analysis]
     
  15. Jun 26, 2011 #14
    So my expert, Dick Mol is not familiar with this species, which means that several 10,000s Pleistocene mammal species can be considered eliminated. He thinks that it could be from a local mammal species from the Australian fauna and he urges to consult a local paleonthologist. It could be interesting.
     
  16. Jun 27, 2011 #15
    Interesting....
    Does he have an idea as to how old it might be? i've got no idea how long it takes to 'make' a fossil :uhh:
     
  17. Jun 27, 2011 #16
    In the first photograph the structures which resemble teeth look very much like belemnites which are fossilised squid type creatures.
     
  18. Jun 27, 2011 #17
    Meanwhile I have forwarded the pix to the senior fellow of the paleontologic section of the Australian museum.

    http://tinypic.com/r/96ap6p/7
    http://tinypic.com/r/2mwxm5l/7
    http://tinypic.com/r/33yhkpu/7
    http://tinypic.com/r/wi0yt1/7

    (entered the links for easy access to all)

    Well, is this fossil partly or completely mineralized (petrified)? You can judge that by weight, bones are very light. It looks like it is petrified, but it's hard to judge from those pix.

    If it's still bone, it's easy to carbon date. If it is mineralized it's not datable anymore. You can only estimate a minimum time required to mineralize, which is likely dependent on a lot of factors. Fossil bones in Northern Siberia can still be bones after more than 60,000 years, the maximum extend of carbon dating. However bones of a 40-50,000 year old fauna in the North Sea, can be partly mineralized. Bones in Florida seem to mineralize in 10,000 years, so that latter could be a reasonable guess for the minimum age, but it also means that it could be millions of years.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011
  19. Jun 27, 2011 #18
    definately feels heavier than what normal bones of that size should, thanks for helping me out with this!

    couple more closer pics
     

    Attached Files:

  20. Jun 27, 2011 #19
    some more...
     

    Attached Files:

  21. Jun 28, 2011 #20
    Nice find - it might be the skull of something similar to a tapir.
     
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