I know it could be worse, but

  • Thread starter lisab
  • Start date
  • #36
Math Is Hard
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,611
35
You need a treat, Lisa. Go buy yourself something pretty. (And I don't just mean a new bandsaw.)
 
  • #37
Tsu
Gold Member
411
63
What if its a PRETTY bandsaw?
 
  • #38
lisab
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,035
623
What if its a PRETTY bandsaw?

:rofl:

Do they come in pink :!!) ?
 
  • #39
turbo
Gold Member
3,228
55
My neighbor has a HUGE Wood-Mizer bandsaw that can saw very large logs into boards, beams, etc. The wood is held stationary by clamps, dogs, etc, and the saw-frame moves on rollers. The base is square and level, so the saw can be fed through the log with almost no effort. It isn't very pretty, but it's fun to turn logs into beautiful lumber, stick it and stack it to dry. He's also got a full wood shop including planer, jointer, radial arm saw, table saw, miter saw, etc, and he leaves the shop unlocked and gives me free access to everything. Cool!
 
  • #40
lisab
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,035
623
We have a huge one at work, where we have to cut giant glulam beams every day.

But the one I broke was a much smaller one. The blade was pulling strongly to the right as soon as I started the cut, so I adjusted the blade tension a little bit...and everything went haywire. I would make a small adjustment and the response would be highly non-linear. It had to be locked & tagged out.

I think the problem is actually that the teeth are bent a little. No blade adjustment can compensate for bent teeth.

A new blade will hopefully fix it...not a really big deal, but of course it happened during a week where everything else was hitting the fan, too!
 
  • #41
turbo
Gold Member
3,228
55
It's really hard to make a mid-course correction during a band-saw cut because the blade is actually pretty fragile. They have to be brittle and hard to hold an edge, and they have to be thin and light snd flexible enough to make their cuts.
 
Last edited:
  • #42
rewebster
843
2
We have a huge one at work, where we have to cut giant glulam beams every day.

But the one I broke was a much smaller one. The blade was pulling strongly to the right as soon as I started the cut, so I adjusted the blade tension a little bit...and everything went haywire. I would make a small adjustment and the response would be highly non-linear. It had to be locked & tagged out.

I think the problem is actually that the teeth are bent a little. No blade adjustment can compensate for bent teeth.

A new blade will hopefully fix it...not a really big deal, but of course it happened during a week where everything else was hitting the fan, too!

I had a couple summer jobs in California using a band saw for hours at a time. When it started pulling one direction or another, it was either just before the blade broke, or it was dull and needed to be replaced.
 

Suggested for: I know it could be worse, but

  • Last Post
6
Replies
204
Views
24K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Last Post
3
Replies
80
Views
15K
  • Last Post
4
Replies
138
Views
7K
Replies
10
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
13
Views
3K
Replies
17
Views
2K
Top