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I missed you guys SOOOO much

  1. May 4, 2004 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2004 #2
    Maybe I'm paranoid, but I feel extremely suspicious of that link...

    cookiemonster
     
  4. May 4, 2004 #3
    Am I missing something here?
     
  5. May 4, 2004 #4

    Zurtex

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    One of your disproofs seem to assume that [itex]0.\overline{0}1[/itex] and similar numbers are real numbers, they are not. Also sums to infinity have been long established and if you believe they do not exist that you do not believe the number [itex]0.\overline{9}[/itex] exists anyway. Furthermore you say that:

    [tex]0.\overline{3} \neq \frac{1}{3}[/tex]

    You seem to have really lost the plot here and seem to be implying that [itex]0.\overline{3}[/itex] is an irrational number.

    Hmm reading further on I see you do conclude that it is an irrational number. I would therefore be interested to see how you define the number [itex]0.\overline{3}[/itex]. As you state it is neither:

    [tex]\frac{1}{3}[/tex]

    or

    [tex]\sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \frac{3}{10^n}[/tex]
     
  6. May 4, 2004 #5
    Zurtex: i DID state that they are not standard notation... they are numbers just the same, however.

    i THINK i explained 1/3 and [itex]0.\overline{3}[/itex] quite well in one of the pages as to how they can or cannot be rational etc.

    aha here we go
    http://home.earthlink.net/~ram1024/where.html
    proof #4

    and actually if i'm doing the sigma thing correctly [tex]\sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \frac{3}{10^n}[/tex] does create [itex]0.\overline{3}[/itex]
     
  7. May 4, 2004 #6

    Zurtex

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    Hmm, I've had an idea. Lets for one moment assume you are correct and say that [itex]0.\overline{0}1[/itex] is a real number. Then:

    [tex]0.\overline{0}1 = \frac{1}{\infty}[/tex]

    As infinity halved is still infinity then:

    [tex]\frac{1}{2}\infty = \infty[/tex]

    Taking the reciprocal of both sides:

    [tex]2 \left( \frac{1}{\infty} \right) = \frac{1}{\infty}[/tex]

    Using out identity:

    [tex]0.\overline{0}1 = \frac{1}{\infty}[/tex]

    Then:

    [tex]2(0.\overline{0}1) = 0.\overline{0}1[/tex]

    Taking away [itex]0.\overline{0}1[/itex] from both sides:

    [tex]0.\overline{0}1 = 0[/tex]
     
  8. May 4, 2004 #7

    Zurtex

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    What do you mean create? This isn't physics, in maths either a number is equal or it isn't.
     
  9. May 4, 2004 #8
    whoa whoa... where did you get THAT from. 1/2 infinity = infinity? I think not.

    1/2 infinity = 1/2 infinity

    1/2 infinity < infinity

    it's unresolvable in the first place and [tex]\frac{1}{2}\infty = \infty[/tex] is just not logical
     
  10. May 4, 2004 #9

    chroot

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    ram,

    Quit being such a ****head and put your topics where they belong. You're allowed to talk about them all you want, as long as you put them in the right place.

    - Warren
     
  11. May 4, 2004 #10

    Zurtex

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    :rolleyes: Well at least I now know you really do have no understanding of mathematics even at the philosophical level.

    Infinity isn't a real number, do you think it is going to behave like other numbers?

    E.g

    Person A has an infinite number of bananas. For every 2 bananas person A has, Person B has 1 banana. Does person B have an infinite number of bananas?
     
  12. May 4, 2004 #11
    well 1/3 creates a "process" as can be described using my expanded notation.

    [tex]\sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \frac{3}{10^n}[/tex] creates .3 + .03 + .003 etc etc which does NOT include the process.

    just trying to see if it's safe to say that [tex]\sum_{n=1}^{\infty} \frac{3}{10^n}[/tex] = [itex]0.\overline{3}[/itex]

    and i think it is
     
  13. May 4, 2004 #12
    yes. but he has LESS than person A

    not EQUAL

    Infinity + 1 > Infinity
     
  14. May 4, 2004 #13

    Zurtex

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    ty, my point is proven.
     
  15. May 4, 2004 #14

    Integral

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    So you have concluded that .333... is a irrational number.

    Does that mean that .1 (base 3) is also irrational? Just what is an irratioal number to you?
     
  16. May 4, 2004 #15
    that's a different notational system.

    just as 1/3 is a different system than decimal base 10.

    1/3 converts perfectly to .1(base 3) but NOT perfectly as [itex]0.\overline{3}[/itex] (base 10)
     
  17. May 4, 2004 #16

    Zurtex

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    :rolleyes: So you think there is some default value for infinity?
     
  18. May 4, 2004 #17
    Chroot: don't hate, it's not healthy man. everything is fine.
     
  19. May 4, 2004 #18

    chroot

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    No, ram, everything is not fine. If you continue to disobey our rules here, things will rapidly become less fine.

    Our rules are really not that restrictive. Please follow them, and make both our lives easier.

    - Warren
     
  20. May 4, 2004 #19
    i think in order to use infinity you have to define a default value and extrapolate logical movements from that position.

    this being an alternative to illogically assuming that any values transformed on it have no effect.

    hence you could have > and < expressions detailing conversions in the value of infinity
     
  21. May 4, 2004 #20
    Chroot: i had no earthly idea where to find this mythical "thoery development" page in the first place. so just be calm
     
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