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I survived a poster session

  1. Aug 16, 2006 #1
    My first time, and my mentor was in England that week, so I was all on my own. That was fun.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 16, 2006 #2

    Gokul43201

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    What was your poster about, and where was the session at?
     
  4. Aug 16, 2006 #3

    Student and Postdoc Research Symposium here at Los Alamos.

    I presented the work I had done so far on asteroseismology of FG Vir. Had some interesting results, but a lot of concerns with them as well. The work had focused on some non-standard modifications to the stellar model codes we use that were motivated by stellar hydrodynamics work done by a few guys at U of Az who I met earlier in the summer. Still working on that project, hoping to have a paper written by the end of the summer (still 4 weeks away for me).
     
  5. Aug 16, 2006 #4

    Moonbear

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    Good for you! That's quite an accomplishment to survive your first ever poster presentation without your mentor nearby to rescue you if needed. Was there any other senior member of the lab present to help?
     
  6. Aug 16, 2006 #5

    No, I was quite on my own. The other student working on asteroseismology with my mentor had already headed back to school for the year, and the others were all working on completely different things. Although it wasn't an astrophysics conference, so there weren't too many people directly familiar with the material. However there has been some talk of me presenting this at the asteroseismology conference next summer :bugeye:
     
  7. Aug 16, 2006 #6

    Math Is Hard

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    Wow! Franz! That is awesome!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:cool:
    *pats Franz on the back*
     
  8. Aug 17, 2006 #7

    Danger

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    Going by the reaction of the pros, and your description of the subject matter, I gotta say congrats. :cool:
    Now would someone care to tell me what the hell a 'poster' is?
     
  9. Aug 17, 2006 #8
    best way to survive a poster session is to stay away from your poster!
     
  10. Aug 17, 2006 #9

    Danger

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    Thanks, Matt; that really cleared it up for me. :rolleyes:
     
  11. Aug 17, 2006 #10
    Exactly what it sounds like. I described it to my non-science majoring friends back home as 'Professional Science Fair'. You have a poster that quickly summarizes your work, with some relevant descriptions/data.
     
  12. Aug 17, 2006 #11
    :rofl:

    I did a bit of that. Went around and interrogated the other astrophysics presenters. One guy had done SPH simulations of planet formation in a 50 AU binary system. Interesting stuff. The girl who was next to me worked in the Detonation Experiments divisions. She got to fire projectiles at high explosives and blow stuff up in her research. I just get to play with computers :frown: . Of course, astrophysical explosions are much better. :biggrin:
     
  13. Aug 17, 2006 #12

    Danger

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    Oh... okay. That sounds like it must be pretty tough. How the hell can you summarize something like an astroseismology study onto a piece of Bristolboard?

    I might not be around for the answer. W just came upstairs and said 'Tell your girlfriend goodnight.' She can't get it through her head that this isn't some kind of online dating service. (As if I could ever be interested in a Bush fan...:rolleyes: )
    Anyhow, congrats again. Good work, dude.
     
  14. Aug 17, 2006 #13
    Well, actually the display areas are about six feet by 3 feet (though I actually thought we had twice as much space, so I had waayy too much stuff).

    Huh?
     
  15. Aug 17, 2006 #14

    SpaceTiger

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    Ugh, conferences are really painful...especially the poster sessions. Glad to hear you survived.
     
  16. Aug 17, 2006 #15

    Gokul43201

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    Asteroseismology - the internal structure of stars (Latin - I think: aster = star)

    Good job, Franz. Maybe you can hook up with the girl-next-board and work on some explosions!
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2006
  17. Aug 17, 2006 #16

    Astronuc

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    Congratulations, Franz!

    Danger, a 'poster' is a summary of one's work, as opposed to a paper and presentation. Many scientific/technical conferences have poster sessions as well as paper sessions.

    In a poster session, people wander around in the same room looking at different posters, as opposed to listening to one person give a presentation in front of an audience.
     
  18. Aug 17, 2006 #17

    Danger

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    She thinks that you're a girl. She thinks that anyone I interact with on line is a girl. I showed her Astro's picture, and she thinks that he's a girl :bugeye: . (I admit that there are some pretty hairy women in her family, but that's a stretch.)

    I think that I've got it. Is that then equivalent to the (abstract?) that comes with a paper?

    Sorry about screwing up the name of the subject. I'm so used to other people's typos that I 'corrected' it automatically. :redface:
     
  19. Aug 17, 2006 #18

    Math Is Hard

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    Oh, man, I really missed my calling!

    Where's the green-with-envy smilie?
     
  20. Aug 17, 2006 #19
    No, posters have abstracts like papers do (sometimes the same abstracts, in my case I just reworked my poster abstract into A&A format for the paper I'm trying to get written). In my case, the poster was actually made from a set of powerpoint slides (which will also form the basis of a technical talk I'm going supposed to give to X division at some point. That will be scary, given that I will be giving the talk to some of the people who are the definitive experts in asteroseismology.)
     
  21. Aug 17, 2006 #20

    Well just think, if you want to make a living blowing stuff up, just become a physicist.
     
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