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I want a PhD in Star Trek!

  1. Jan 23, 2008 #1

    Math Is Hard

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  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 23, 2008 #2

    G01

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    Wow. Does this mean I can get a PhD in Stargate SG1 or Doctor Who?!
     
  4. Jan 23, 2008 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    I deserve a Ph.D. in Star Trek as I've easily done as much research.

    Janus deserves a Nobel Prize!

    Well...do PF threads count as published papers?
     
  5. Jan 23, 2008 #4

    Astronuc

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    Probably. But one would have to change majors.

    Or get busy and invent a warp drive, worm hole and/or tardis. :biggrin:
     
  6. Jan 23, 2008 #5

    Math Is Hard

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    You totally could! You could get a PhD in Comparative Science Fiction and cover both shows.
     
  7. Jan 23, 2008 #6

    G01

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    I've had a TARDIS for years!! The problem is, I can't find it since my camouflages circuit still works. I have no idea what shape its in. (I'm sure glad no one was around when I tried to make the shower time travel to the year 1823.)
     
  8. Jan 23, 2008 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    Just watch for anything bigger on the inside than on the outside. What's the problem?
     
  9. Jan 23, 2008 #8

    G01

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    I have been wondering how I could fit that tennis court in that trash can out back...

    Hmmmm...
     
  10. Jan 24, 2008 #9

    f95toli

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    Is this really the first thesis written about Star Trek?
    It seems like a rather "obvious" subject considering how influential the show has been.
     
  11. Jan 24, 2008 #10

    Kurdt

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    I could do with one of those. My career prospects will be significantly broadened.
     
  12. Jan 24, 2008 #11

    jim mcnamara

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    Or do you mean limited to Star Trek conventions? Are those things still going on?
     
  13. Jan 24, 2008 #12
    Don't worry. I've got a RETARDIS chip implanted in my skull that allows me to see cloaked dimensional anomalies. If your TARDIS is out there I'll find it eventually. I don't think I can help you find the shower you left in 1823. A good metal detector might help.
     
  14. Jan 24, 2008 #13

    Janus

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    The tricky part about getiing your PhD in Star Trek is that you have to take your orals in Klingonese.
     
  15. Jan 24, 2008 #14

    Math Is Hard

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    The thesis defense sounds like it might be a bit more dangerous than usual (if Klingons are involved).
     
  16. Jan 24, 2008 #15

    Astronuc

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    So how 'bout those Romulans? :biggrin:
     
  17. Jan 24, 2008 #16

    Kurdt

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    They supply the ale for the party after a successful defense.
     
  18. Jan 24, 2008 #17
    Shoot, and all this time I thought that majoring in astrophysics meant I could say "I'm getting my PhD in Star Trek."
     
  19. Jan 24, 2008 #18

    Astronuc

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  20. Jan 25, 2008 #19

    BobG

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    One good idea for a thesis would be an explanation of how time moves and is kept track of in StarTrek. I find the stardates very confusing. Part of this can be chalked up to relativity. Time is passing at different rates for every ship within the Federation Starfleet. Yet, somehow, everyone within the Federation has to resynchronize to some common time or the ships would never know when to meet.

    In the original series, stardates ran from 1512.2 to 5928.5.

    By time "Star Trek: The Next Generation" starts, stardates are in the 41000+ range with the second digit indicating the season, which doesn't necessarily have to correspond to a year within the show. In fact, an Earth year must be somewhere around 800 to 1000 units per year.

    I think they changed the length of a second, as well. It actually makes sense if humanity no longer is constrained to one planet. The idea of leap years becomes very inconvenient, so it becomes easier to extend the length of a second so a day is still 86400 seconds long, but each year is 365.25 days long.

    Still, an exact explanation of how stardates work would make the entire series of Star Trek TV shows and movies easier to understand.
     
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