I want to talk 2 U!

  • Thread starter GreenApple
  • Start date
  • #26
rhuthwaite said:
It really depends if you are talking about one school or multiple schools as to which one you use. What time is this website set too?
The sentence he used "a school" in means the exact same thing with either "a school" or "schools" at least to me.. but as I said I never was the best at English.

Edit:
<----- Shiney 200 posts >:D
 
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  • #27
1,997
5
你的英语很好 :smile:
 
  • #28
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MeJennifer said:
你的英语很好 :smile:
Thanks. And I am glad I have come across someone who can speak Chinese.

I have a question here: under what circumstance do you say "there you go" to someone?
 
  • #29
I looked up a site because I knew I would explain it badly. Here is the extract. From "http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/28/messages/157.html"

There you go" is informal. It's said by a person fulfilling another's request for something. A: "Pass the salt, please." B, handing salt: "There you go." The phrase connotes closure or satisfaction for the listener; for example, A, who wanted salt, now has it.

"There you go" may be descended historically from "There you are," which would also fit the salt-passing scene and is a little more formal.

It can also be used as a way of remarking that someone's desire for something intangible is or will be fulfilled. A: "I don't know how to dress for the costume party. The guests were told to come as somebody famous." B: "Well, who comes to mind?" A: "Oh, maybe Shakespeare." B: "THERE you go!" B means that Shakespeare meets the requirement; dressing as Shakespeare will do.

Orderlies turning over a patient might say "There we go" in line with the practice of medical personnel who use "we" instead of "you" when addressing a patient, or their "we" might refer to their group. In the latter case, they'd be noting that the group has successfully completed its task.

There's another "There you go," not to be confused with the one you asked about. A: "Can you make a phone call for me?" B, who is angry: "There you go" (or "There you go again"), "expecting me to do you a favor."
 
  • #30
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Thanks, I think I got it. :)
 
  • #31
1,997
5
GreenApple said:
Thanks. And I am glad I have come across someone who can speak Chinese.
Well I am just a beginning student in writing and speaking Mandarin. :smile:
 
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  • #32
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Well, you can ask me any question about it.
I am glad to help :)
 
  • #33
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I have some other questions.
What is the difference between the tow sentences "She is pretty, isn't she? " and "She isn't pretty, is she? "?
 
  • #34
DaveC426913
Gold Member
19,094
2,604
GreenApple said:
I have some other questions.
What is the difference between the tow sentences "She is pretty, isn't she? " and "She isn't pretty, is she? "?
Both are really two sentences mashed together.

She is pretty. Isn't she pretty?
She isn't pretty. Is she pretty?

In both cases, the first sentence states your opinion on the matter (She is pretty / she is not pretty), while the second sentence asks for someone else's opinion as to whether your opinion is wrong.
 
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  • #35
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Another question:
What am I suppose to say when someone say "whould mind opening the door?" ?
Sould I say "sure, no problem" or "no, of cause not" ,provided I want to do the favour?
 
  • #36
LURCH
Science Advisor
2,549
118
Now there's a question even English-speaking people can't allways answer! Truthfully, either of those responses would be fine. The important thing is that you don't just say "yes" or "no", as either of these answers would still leave your meaning unclear. "Yes" could mean "yes, I'll open the door" or "yes, I would mind". "No" could mean either, "No, I don't mind", or "No, I won't open the door".

By the way, the question needs a subject, "Would you mind...". Sometimes in English the word "you" is not needed because it is strongly implied (called an "understood you"), but this sentence is not one of those times.

May I say, you're doing great so far. In your shorter posts, I would not have known that English was not your first language if you hadn't told us.
 
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  • #37
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I am always gratefull for all your help.

I got this sentence from a dictionary:
Clarke says his team could have lasted another 15 days before fatigue would have begun to take a toll.
I am just wondering why it was not this sentence :
Clarke says his team could last another 15 days before fatigue would begin to take a toll.
 
  • #38
478
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The two sentences talk about an event at different time periods. The first sentence says "could have lasted" and "would have begun," showing that the event happened in the past and is no longer occuring.

If you were to say "could last" and "would begin," there is the idea that the event is still occuring.
 

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