I wish I hadn't worked so hard.

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  • #26
jim hardy
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Interesting - four of the five relate to self awareness and relationships, the only career oriented one says it was a mistake to take it so seriously.

Out here they got a name for rain
For wind and fire only
But when you’re lost and all alone
There ain’t no word but lonely

And I’m a lost and lonely man
Without a star to guide me
Maria blow my love to me
I need my girl beside me

Maria
Maria
They call the wind Maria

source: http://www.lyricsondemand.com/
 
  • #27
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I'd GLADLY trade in a lucrative 6 figure job to make 50-70k with more vacation time. I don't need a big house, don't need a fancy car, and need expensive clothing to be happy. Give me more vacation time so I can spend my money traveling the world. There's always time for work, but not enough time for doing things while you are young.
 
  • #28
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I've spent a lot of time in factories and have seen many jobs that would probably lead to suicide if that's what I had to do every day. But when I talk with many of these folks, they often indicate that their job is "okay" but they would hate to do what I do. :confused:

What is it that you do? If you don't mind me asking.
 
  • #29
Ivan Seeking
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What is it that you do? If you don't mind me asking.

Systems integration and engineering [while on the road]. I still do both but a lot more R&D now... and only within driving distance except in rare cases. I mostly work from home now.
 
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  • #30
turbo
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Ivan's right. Life on the road sucks. You can be pulling in really great money, but if you have to live in motels in podunk towns and try to search out diners and truck-stops with food marginally better than fast-food, that gets old fast. Still, I did mill-work for 10 years as a process chemist, and as a lead papermaker. Lots of troubleshooting, so those jobs weren't brain-numbing like my college summer jobs on production lines in veneer mills.
 
  • #31
Ivan Seeking
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Ivan's right. Life on the road sucks. You can be pulling in really great money, but if you have to live in motels in podunk towns and try to search out diners and truck-stops with food marginally better than fast-food, that gets old fast. Still, I did mill-work for 10 years as a process chemist, and as a lead papermaker. Lots of troubleshooting, so those jobs weren't brain-numbing like my college summer jobs on production lines in veneer mills.

Turbo, I usually had the best hotels, the best food, first-class flights, classy rental cars, and white hat treatment at all plants, and it was still as close to hell as I've ever been.

It doesn't matter if your room cost $60 or $300, living on the road is a very hard and lonely life. And in the end, even $300 hotel rooms are just stinking hotel rooms!
 
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  • #32
Ivan Seeking
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...although I must say, while in the end nothing else matters much, flying first class does actually help a bit. Those cramped seats in coach add to the travel fatigue.
 
  • #33
turbo
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It doesn't matter if your room cost $60 or $300, living on the road is a very hard and lonely life. And in the end, even $300 hotel rooms are just stinking hotel rooms!
Yep. And if the high point of your day is an evening phone call to your spouse, and you have to keep working into the night, it can be a really sad life.
 

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