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Ic suffix in chem nomenclature

  1. Nov 5, 2005 #1

    Math Is Hard

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    What does the ic suffix mean in compound names? For instance ferric, plumbic, cupric? I'm guessing it has something to do with the charge on the metal ion?
    I have some nomenclature rules from my teacher but this isn't covered. Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 5, 2005 #2
    -ic is the coplement to -ous. -ic represents the higher oxidation state; -ous the lower for multivalence transition metallic ions

    ferric is equivalent to iron (III) or Fe+3
    ferrous is equivilent to iron (II) or Fe+2

    plumbic = Pb+4
    plumbous = Pb+2

    cupric = Cu+2
    cuprous = Cu+

    The -ic /-ous suffixes are also used for acids of -ate (1 higher oxidation state than -ite),-ite anions respectively
    eg, the nitrate ion (NO3-) and nitric acid: HNO3
    nitrous ion (NO2-) and nitrous acid: HNO2

    or phosphate ion (PO4-3) and phosphoric acid: H3PO4
    phosphite ion (PO3-3) and phosphorous acid: H3PO3
     
  4. Nov 5, 2005 #3

    Math Is Hard

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    Thanks, Cesium!
     
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