Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Ice should sink?

  1. Jan 10, 2014 #1
    Please help. Ice is more denser than water when temperature of water ≥9°C. Then why ice doesn't sink in water at these temperatures? I greatly appreciate your help.
    Density chart: http://www2.volstate.edu/chem/1110/Density_of_Water.htm [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 10, 2014 #2
    I don't see the water density becoming smaller than that in the chart you linked to, at 9 degrees the water was at the 0.9997xx area.
     
  4. Jan 10, 2014 #3

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Ice and water can't exist together at >9C (in equilibrium). Ice melts and water freezes at 0C and as soon as you drop ice into water, the water's temperature starts to drop until there is quickly an equilibrium (at least locally).

    [edit]....er, yeah, and it looks like the density claim is wrong anyway. Ice's density is 0.917...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. Jan 10, 2014 #4
    ice float

    As per any density-Temp chart or graph I found online giving unique info and that is ice is denser than water at temperatures more than 9C. Please be specific about temperatures.
     
  6. Jan 10, 2014 #5

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Where is ice listed in the chart in your link? All I see is water density numbers.

    And as has been said already, ice does not exist at 9C...
     
  7. Jan 10, 2014 #6
    Thank you for your time my friend. Do you think that water of any temperature is denser than ice?
    For example which is more denser? ice(0C) or water(20C)
     
  8. Jan 10, 2014 #7

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    If ice has the density quoted or 0.917g/cm^3, and you look at your table, what do you think?

    What is the context of your question?
     
  9. Jan 10, 2014 #8
    No context my friend. I was reading a physics book and curious to know more about it. so, you think that ice is less denser than water of any temperature. Is that correct? thank you.
     
  10. Jan 10, 2014 #9

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Why don't you give the link to that reference so we know what you were looking at.
     
  11. Jan 10, 2014 #10

    Student100

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    Maybe I'm getting a little out of the context of the question, but it's thought super-cooled water at the lower bounds is less dense than ice. There's still a lot of research and experimentation going on about the thermodynamics of super-cooled water.
     
  12. Jan 10, 2014 #11
    Yes, the same chart I posted above my friend. Water density at 9C is 0.999781 g/mL and at 0C is 0.999841 g/mL. So clearly ice denser as per that chart. So shouldn't ice sink? Thank you and sorry to bother you.
    http://www2.volstate.edu/chem/1110/Density_of_Water.htm [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  13. Jan 10, 2014 #12

    Student100

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    No, that's all liquid water.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  14. Jan 10, 2014 #13

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That chart only shows liquid water densities. No mention of ice. (Water can be liquid at 0°C.)
     
  15. Jan 10, 2014 #14
    Oh,Water can be liquid at 0°C. that makes sense. Thank you so muchhhhh.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Ice should sink?
  1. Floating and sinking (Replies: 9)

Loading...