Ideal gas question

  • Thread starter Borat321
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  • #1
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Here's an ideal gas law question:

A scuba diver is 32 m below the surface of a lake, where the temperature is 5°C. He releases an air bubble with a volume of 12 cm^3. The bubble rises to the surface, where the temperature is 25°C. What is the volume of the bubble right before it breaks the surface? (Hint: Remember that the pressure also changes.)

I thought it would be the following:

Initial:
Pressure @ 32m = 4.2atm, since 10m=1atm under water
12cm^3=.012 litres
5C= 278K

Final:
Pressure @ 0m = 1atm
V= unknown
25C= 298K

Then, use PV/T=PV/T... but apparently it's wrong - does anyone know why?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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seems right, whats the correct answer?
 
  • #3
Kurdt
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Science Advisor
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Should be fine, all you have to do is rearrange the final equation you wrote for the second volume and plug the numbers in.
 

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