Ignition Temp: Gasoline vs. Ethanol?

In summary, gasoline has a higher ignition temperature then ethanol. This higher ignition temperature means that gasoline will produce more energy upon combustion.
  • #1
quasi426
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Does gasoline have a higher ignition temperature then ethanol? (all other things being equal like pressure) Also does a higher ignition temperature mean that it will produce more energy upon combustion? Thanks in advance.
 
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  • #2
I think that the ignition temperature of ethanol is roughly 30 degrees higher than gasoline

But I do know that if one looks at the energy content in Nett MJ/kg on sees than ethanol has a value of 26.68, whereas gasoline has a value of 42 - 44. So gasoline has a higher energy content.

Regards,

Ben
 
  • #3
quasi426 said:
Does gasoline have a higher ignition temperature then ethanol? (all other things being equal like pressure) Also does a higher ignition temperature mean that it will produce more energy upon combustion? Thanks in advance.

To be sincere I don't know. Maybe you could find in a table the maximum adiabatic flame temperature of each substance. Also I think there is none general correlation between maximum adiabatic flame temperature and heat power released.

Another possibility is to ask to F.A. Williams, the combustion expert of your University.You know, in some class, hand up and ask, and then you tell me what he says to you. :biggrin: Do you know him?
 
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  • #6
Clausius2 said:
Another possibility is to ask to F.A. Williams, the combustion expert of your University.You know, in some class, hand up and ask, and then you tell me what he says to you. :biggrin: Do you know him?

I don't believe I know him. I am in the bioengineering dept. (undergrad). What department is he in?
 
  • #7
quasi426 said:
I don't believe I know him. I am in the bioengineering dept. (undergrad). What department is he in?

He's in MAE and he is the director of the Center for Combustion Research.

At least, don't you know Prof. Lasheras?, the MAE chairman? He's an spanish aeronautical engineer.
 

Related to Ignition Temp: Gasoline vs. Ethanol?

What is the difference between the ignition temperature of gasoline and ethanol?

The ignition temperature refers to the minimum temperature at which a substance will ignite and sustain combustion. The ignition temperature of gasoline is approximately 257 degrees Celsius, while the ignition temperature of ethanol is about 360 degrees Celsius. This means that ethanol is more difficult to ignite than gasoline.

Why is the ignition temperature of ethanol higher than gasoline?

One reason for the higher ignition temperature of ethanol is its chemical composition. Ethanol contains a higher percentage of oxygen compared to gasoline, which makes it more resistant to ignition. Additionally, ethanol also has a lower vapor pressure, which means it requires a higher temperature to vaporize and ignite.

Does the ignition temperature affect the efficiency of fuel combustion?

Yes, the ignition temperature can have an impact on the efficiency of fuel combustion. A higher ignition temperature means the fuel will require more heat to ignite, resulting in a longer ignition delay. This can lead to incomplete combustion and reduced fuel efficiency. However, other factors such as the engine design and fuel composition also play a role in combustion efficiency.

Are there any safety concerns related to the ignition temperature of ethanol?

Yes, the higher ignition temperature of ethanol can pose safety concerns in certain situations. For example, in a car accident where the fuel tank may rupture, gasoline is more likely to ignite and cause a fire compared to ethanol. However, ethanol has a lower flammability limit, meaning it requires a certain concentration in the air to ignite, making it less likely to cause an explosion.

Can the ignition temperature of gasoline and ethanol be altered?

The ignition temperature of a fuel is primarily determined by its chemical composition. Therefore, altering the composition of gasoline or ethanol can potentially change their ignition temperatures. However, this can also affect other properties of the fuel and may not be a viable solution for practical purposes.

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