Illustrator Help requsted

  • #1
While scaling an object in illustrator CS6,how can we scale that object in both directions but oppositely?
For example,scaling a rectangle from one of its corners outward while the opposite corner also goes outward?
Thanks in advance.
 

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  • #2
DaveC426913
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Scaling so that both (all) corners expand at once? Is that what you mean? This is simply scaling up about a central point as opposed to about the vertex.
scaling.png




Try holding down one of the control keys, such as Alt.
 
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  • #3
Thanks but what i mean is that scaling the object from two sides while other remain at their actual position.
 
  • #4
DaveC426913
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Thanks but what i mean is that scaling the object from two sides while other remain at their actual position.
So, turning a square into a rectangle?
I sure wish you could be more descriptive.

Say you've got a shape - a one unit square - whose coordinates are 0,0 / 0,1 / 1,1 / 1,0.
What do you want them to be when you're done?
 
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  • #5
So, turning a square into a rectangle?
I sure wish you could be more descriptive.

Say you've got a shape - a one unit square - whose coordinates are 0,0 / 0,1 / 1,1 / 1,0.
What do you want them to be when you're done?
For me,it doesn't matter what shape it is..i just want to know how we can scale the corners the guy did in this video:
scaling one anchor point outward and notice the other also goes outward..watch at 2:28..
 
  • #6
DaveC426913
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OK, he added two new anchor points, one centre bottom, one centre top. Then he selected them both (shift-click or ctrl-click? not sure).
Then he uses the scale tool on just those two anchor points ,and scales them up.

But that's not at all what you were asking in the opening post.

The only reason I'm suggesting a rectangle is so that we're both talking about the same thing and it's simple.
But I can't seem to get you to nail down what exactly it is you're expecting. Your description is too ambiguous.

Take the 1 unit box I described: coordinates 0,0 / 0,1 / 1,1 / 1,0.
What do you expect it to look like when you're done? Provide the final coordinates.
 
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  • #8
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You mean you want to symmetrically edit the 2 opposite corners of a square......?
 
  • #9
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Just noticed my error......Edges and not corners, my mistake...!

Essentially you are producing a Hexagon and can use the Polygon tool to produce a shape with a number of sides, in this case a Hexagon, 6 sides and rotate 90 degrees. There's also the, Warp Tool, you could use to turn the square into a Hexagon shape

To do the same as the video.

1. Turn on smart guides [Useful when precision is required]
2. Draw a Square
3. Select the pen tool
4. With the square selected, now move the pen tool to the centre of the square, also the rotational axis. When you've done this, the pen tool will highlight some text telling you, you are; Center, Align 0 degrees, etc.
5. Once you are on the centre move the cursor down slightly and a smart guide is automatically placed at 90 degrees through the centre of the square [Move off that 90 degree axis and the guide will disappear or show a different angle]
6. Follow that 90 degree guide and the point it intersects the edge of the square, again the programme will indicate you are at a point of intersection [Intersect] and using the pen tool, create an Anchor Point.
6a. Follow the same guide and create another Anchor point at the top edge of the square
7. Use the Direct Selection Tool [Clear Arrow] to select the 2 new anchor points.
8. Select the Scale Tool [Arrow inside a rectangle] and move to either the top or lower Anchor Point
9. Move either point up or down....!

If you've done this correctly you should see the square change shape into a hexagon....Next step is to filet the corners

Hope this helps....
 
  • #10
DaveC426913
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I don't know what he wants. How hard can it be to actually describe? Yet he refuses.
 
  • #11
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From his original post he's described a rhombus and from his second post with the video a hexagon, apart from that I would not like to say...!

a.gif




What is interesting is, slightly O/T. With a symmetrical edit on the Y axis and a non symmetrical edit along the X axis you have the start of a Tessellation.


b.gif
 
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