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I'm about to do something dangerous

  1. May 22, 2005 #1

    Evo

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    Ok, I'm such a klutz that just about anything I attempt is dangerous. :redface:

    Thanks to the recent 70mph winds, my weeping willow tree had the top break and is now touching the ground. Unfortunately it didn't completely break off. :grumpy: It's a really large section with very thick branches.

    Sure, I could call a tree service, but I have a ladder and a saw. :devil:

    I decided not to get a chainsaw because I would certainly end up removing a critical body part. :redface:

    I will probably be out there all day sawing on the thing. But I can't mow around the tree until it's removed. If I don't remove this soon, the yard police will take me away. :rolleyes:

    Which brings me to Part II - Lawn Wars. My next door neighbor is a freak about mowing his yard. He is now mowing it every three days. Plus he mows it everytime I mow mine. I tested this a couple of times the past month by deliberately mowing my yard the day after he mowed his. Obviously his yard did NOT need mowing again, but as soon as I finished mowing, he mowed his again. It's rather funny.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 22, 2005 #2
    Once you get that piece detached, don't throw it away. You'll have the makings of a good brush shelter. I so envy you.
     
  4. May 22, 2005 #3

    cronxeh

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    millions of years of evolution.. and we are mowing lawns
     
  5. May 22, 2005 #4

    Evo

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    I need sheep.

    zoobie, with all the branches from tree pruning yesterday, I have a very fine brush shelter. The cats are loving it.

    Also, I just realized how much my right shoulder and arm hurt from all of the sawing and pruning I did yesterday. :grumpy:
     
  6. May 22, 2005 #5

    Hurkyl

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    You seem in need of a devil's advocate!

    It might not be safe to even be around the tree -- there's no telling if there is enough strain to finish the process, and you don't want to be nearby when it finally snaps!

    And when you do finally cut it, where is it going to fall? Could it teeter over and crush something nearby? Or maybe it will fall towards you and knock over the ladder...
     
  7. May 22, 2005 #6

    Evo

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    Probably all of the above. :biggrin: Main reason I'm not using a chainsaw, I can see me dropping it on my leg, or it falling to the ground and me falling on top of it. At least I have a fighting chance with a handsaw.

    What I am doing is cutting small sections, from the ground up. Trimming off the small branches with my loppers first, then moving up the length with the saw. Since I am afraid of heights, it just adds to the fun. :bugeye:

    I'm already back inside taking a break.
     
  8. May 22, 2005 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    Oh good I can breath again! :yuck:

    Yep, chainsaws and trees can both be pretty dangerous. I have a 36" Husky but I prefer not to even use it. My little 18" Craftsman works just fine for nearly all jobs.
     
  9. May 22, 2005 #8

    Hurkyl

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    Eep! Hope you don't cut anything helping support it...
     
  10. May 22, 2005 #9
    You should use a winch so you can control which way the tree falls. Attach the winch to a solid object in the direction you want the tree to fall, and attach the cable to the tree. Then crank it tight, saw some of the tree, crank it tight again, saw some more, and so on until it falls over. Saw from the outside, not the inside so it does not trap the saw.
     
  11. May 22, 2005 #10

    Astronuc

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    :surprised Worried as h***! I think I just aged 20 yrs.

    Please be very careful - I'd rather you call someone.

    Sawing branches or trunks can be hazardous. The weight can be significant. If you have to get on a ladder, I would advise against it.

    How much do you have done?
     
  12. May 22, 2005 #11

    Evo

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    The tree itself seems sturdy, it's just that top part.

    There was a nice strong breeze this morning, of course now there is no breeze at all. I think my biggest concern now is heart failure. <pant>

    Man, that is a LOT of wood. It was such a beautiful tree and now it is lopsided. It was the child of Evo's favorite tree, we planted it together. She won't even go in the back and look at it. :frown:
     
  13. May 22, 2005 #12

    Evo

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    About 4' up, but willows branch a lot, so we're talking about a wide area.

    I hear a lot of creaking above me, but there is a very strong branch above me that it would fall on that should stop it from hitting me.

    I kid a lot, but seriously, I'm super safe, I have to be because I am so uncoordinated. :biggrin:
     
  14. May 22, 2005 #13

    Astronuc

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    I presume strong branch means thick (massive) branch. I may be fine unless it gets overloaded, especially near the trunk and peels away.

    Since you seemed determined to do this, please be careful!
     
  15. May 22, 2005 #14

    brewnog

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    Ahhh quit worrying about her!

    Go and chop that tree, Evo!
     
  16. May 22, 2005 #15

    Evo

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    See? Brewnog has faith in me!! But that's probably because he didn't read the "klutz" entry in my journal. The burn from melting the wrench when I changed my lawn mower battery has healed nicely. :shy:
     
  17. May 22, 2005 #16

    JamesU

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    Wouldn't an axe be easier than the hand saw?
     
  18. May 22, 2005 #17

    Evo

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    The branches move too much, easier with the little curved saw.
     
  19. May 22, 2005 #18

    Monique

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    Just compliment your neighbour on his garden and complain about the tree, the problem might fix itself :)
     
  20. May 22, 2005 #19

    brewnog

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    Evo, since I didn't realise how much of a klutz you are, I'll change my advice.


    Go and buy a flexible saw, tie some nice long cords onto it, tie a weight to one of the ropes, and chuck it over the branch. Stand well back, and saw away!
     
  21. May 22, 2005 #20

    Evo

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    Not him, he's probably thrilled that I'm dealing with this, it makes his yard look better. :grumpy:
     
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