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I'm desparate here

  1. Feb 7, 2006 #1

    JasonRox

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    I have a Complex Analysis class, and I have to say that it draws a blank right now.

    Sure, I haven't had any problems answering any of the problems he has assigned. It still draws a blank anyways.

    I want to see things happen, which I clearly don't see.

    The class also has no textbook, but I bought some cheap one at a second hand bookstore for like $4. That's not cutting it though. This book isn't the greatest, but it has explained some stuff better than the professor did... that's because he doesn't explain.

    My biggest problem has to be with periodic strip stuff.

    Anyone has anyone got any good suggestions for a textbook?

    Anyways, I'll keep at it. Reading week (vacation) is next week, so I'll be sure to look over all my notes.

    Note: Also, a textbook with nice noble proofs would be nice. His proofs are just ridiculous and should be thrown in the garbage.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 7, 2006 #2
    In my complex analysis class we use Fundamentals of Complex Analysis with Applications to Engineering and Science by Saff and Snyder, it isn't too bad a book it's readable in some places and difficult in others, there are quite a few proofs in it though. Your class sounds about like mine does, my professor is ok, he writes really messy math and it's hard to follow him sometimes so I have to figure out some things on my own, but now that we're getting more into the calculus side of things I think I'm starting to enjoy the subject more.
     
  4. Feb 7, 2006 #3

    JasonRox

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    Thanks for the suggestion. :smile:

    I'm looking into buying one during the reading week.

    I wish I can work with it, but I got nothing to work with.

    I usually follow the textbook, but this one is clearly not thorough at all.

    Here are the textbooks I have access to from the library. I plan on picking one up for the reading week.

    http://catalogue.library.brocku.ca/...act&FF=dfunctions+of+complex+variables&1,106,
     
  5. Feb 7, 2006 #4

    quasar987

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    Can you read french?

    If so, I got a pdf for you. It's the book we're curently using.
     
  6. Feb 7, 2006 #5

    JasonRox

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    Oui, je peut communiquer en francais. Je ne suis pas le meilleur, mais je peut l'essayer.

    Where can I find the .pdf?
     
  7. Feb 8, 2006 #6

    quasar987

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  8. Feb 8, 2006 #7

    matt grime

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    If you can find it Kelley's General Topology is a misleadingly titled book about Complex analysis.
     
  9. Feb 8, 2006 #8

    JasonRox

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  10. Feb 8, 2006 #9

    matt grime

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    that certainly looks like it, but my memory seems to be playing tricks on me. looking back at my copy it doesn't have any complex analysis in at all. why did i think it did? probably because it was recommended for a course i did on riemann surfaces.
     
  11. Feb 8, 2006 #10

    JasonRox

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    I'll take a look at the library and see what I can find.
     
  12. Feb 8, 2006 #11

    matt grime

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    If you want a litmus for an interesting result in complex analysis then I'd suggest making sure that the book has a proof of Morera's theorem (for triangles). I hope that is a universal appelation. Google indicates it is. It is the converse of Cauchy's Theorem that the integral of a holomorphic function around a contractible path is zero. It, Morera, has truly elegant proof.
     
  13. Mar 28, 2006 #12

    JasonRox

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    Well, my professor certainly didn't mention Morera's Theorem. I read about it in my textbook.

    I'm yet to find a better textbook.
     
  14. Mar 29, 2006 #13

    quasar987

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    you can look it up as well as the proof in the pdf i "recommended". It's one of the exercices. Juch search the document with CTRL+F for Morera.
     
  15. Mar 29, 2006 #14

    J77

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    Yeah - get an engineering book which deals with poles, integrals around etc.

    As one kid shouted out in my complex analysis classes...

    Cauchy sucks!

    I don't know anyone who actually enjoyed it.
     
  16. Mar 29, 2006 #15

    JasonRox

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    Cauchy's work is beautiful.

    You obviously don't know what's going on then.
     
  17. Mar 29, 2006 #16

    JasonRox

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    In the text I got, they didn't bother to prove it. It's rather "obvious" after the preceding discussion before the theorem.
     
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