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Im melting

  1. Aug 8, 2007 #1
    Its 101F and 37% humidity.

    Stupid global warming.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 8, 2007 #2
  4. Aug 8, 2007 #3
    And it feels like its 110 outside thanks to the humidity. (Also, the sun is going down now)
     
  5. Aug 8, 2007 #4

    Evo

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    It's the Dog Days of summer.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_Days
     
  6. Aug 8, 2007 #5

    turbo

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    It's only 81 here, but at 83% RH you wouldn't want to exert yourself outdoors. The air feels thick.
     
  7. Aug 8, 2007 #6

    Moonbear

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    Currently, it's only 78...and 85% humidity! :yuck: It was hotter mid-afternoon, of course. I'm hoping some of the thunderstorms that have just rolled through are bringing a more pleasant change of temperature, but the ones we got every other day this week only seem to be bringing worse and worse heat and humidity. :grumpy:
     
  8. Aug 8, 2007 #7

    turbo

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    We got a line of them last week that led to the formation of either a tornado or a VERY strong microburst that snapped hundreds of huge trees on the shore a pond a couple of miles from here, smashing camps, lake-side homes, vehicles, etc. Trees with trunks 2-3' in diameter were snapped like twigs, and those that would not snap were uprooted. Power may be restored there in a week or so - restoration of damaged buildings and clean-up of debris will take months, at best.

    Parts of my garden were flattened by the storms, although I have shored up the pepper plants, re-braced the tomato plants, re-trellised my squash and cucumbers, and it looks like most everything will recover. Some of the "convenience" plantings like a windowbox of cucumbers on the rail of the back deck are a loss. Cucumber plants can stand some stress, but a 15' fall off a railing to the ground is pushing the envelope.
     
  9. Aug 8, 2007 #8

    G01

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    It was a little above 90F here today, and really humid. I was helping paint my grandfather's house today, and the house has no air conditioning!:yuck:
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2007
  10. Aug 8, 2007 #9

    Integral

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    Only 37% ? I thought you east coasters (that is a little different from a coffee coaster) didn't even recognize humidity until it hit %110?
     
  11. Aug 8, 2007 #10
    Yeah, 37% is low for around here (Usually in the +80% range), but at such high temperatures even low amounts of humidity becomes horrible.
     
  12. Aug 9, 2007 #11
    And I'm smeeeeltiiing :rolleyes:

    It will get stickier and stickier. Everybody's guilty.

    3 nights ago there was this big storm and it rained all evening and all night - first very hard, then some of the drops fell frozen and finally there was a thuinderstorm - all rain and lightning and thunder and A few times I went up to the window and imagined that I was in a horror movie and a mad scientist upstairs was making his monster. :approve: :rofl:
     
  13. Aug 9, 2007 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    Tornado Struck New York City
    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=a8E9Rh9nu.sI&refer=us

    Here in Oregon it is a sweltering 75 degrees, which is actually too hot for me. :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2007
  14. Aug 9, 2007 #13

    Evo

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    I remember tornadoes in Vermont when I lived in upstate NY, I was surprised that they had tornadoes in the north east.

    New York ranks 30th in the number of tornadoes and 27th in the number of deaths.

    http://www.disastercenter.com/newyork/tornado.html

    :grumpy:
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2007
  15. Aug 9, 2007 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was once in a tornado in Long Beach, Ca. We didn't realized what was happening until we heard the choo choo effect. Luckily it wasn't large enough to do serious damage to the building.

    Had a close call in Frankfurt, Indiana. A large tornado passed right by my hotel in the middle of the night. I awoke to the "take cover" warning on the TV! That was a bit exciting. :bugeye: I was in a Holiday Inn located right in the middle of about 600 sq miles of corn fields.
     
  16. Aug 9, 2007 #15

    Evo

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    Yeah, that happened to me near Saratoga Springs, NY, we were having a terrible storm and then I heard that train noise and thought I was a gonner.

    I also found out that there is a fault line here in Missouri and we are way overdue for a catastrophic earthquake. :bugeye:
     
  17. Aug 9, 2007 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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  18. Aug 9, 2007 #17

    Evo

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  19. Aug 9, 2007 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    Whoops! You have a point there. In fact I would bet that the quake will generate earth lights that trigger a lightning strike that hits your chainsaw while your are standing under a dangerous tree... :biggrin:
     
  20. Aug 9, 2007 #19
    Everyone be on the lookout for dangerous trees. They are easy to recognise, they have long limbs and a green coat.

    Evo has a chain saw?? :surprised
     
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