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Impact-sensitive body armour

  1. Aug 20, 2006 #1

    DaveC426913

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    There was a thread around here a few weeks back about futuristic armour that could distribute the energy of an impact.

    I just watched an article on TV about this cool substance they're putting in sports outfits. It was called D3O.

    I watched this guy take a hand-sized lump - it looks and behaves exactly like plasticine - and mold it easily into an amorphous blob. He then picked up a hammer and whammed it several times, and it hardly distorted at all!

    Sci-fi eat yer heart out!
     
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  3. Aug 20, 2006 #2

    Clausius2

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  4. Aug 20, 2006 #3

    Danger

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    It sounds like a mouldable version of Sorbothane. That stuff was invented by some Brit researchers over 25 years ago. They were trying to make artificial skin for transplantation to burn victims. It turned out that it wasn't biologically compatible, but displayed amazing shock-absorbtion properties. I saw a demonstration that one of their representatives performed on 'The Tonight Show' when Carson was still hosting it. He had a block of the stuff about 2 inches on a side, cut in half with a hemispherical cavity carved out of each half. He set one on Carson's desk with the cavity up, placed a raw egg in it, and covered it with the other half. As Carson watched in obvious concern for his wardrobe, the guy proceded to whap the top block with a large hammer. Nothing happened. :bugeye:
    As to the body-armour, I believe that you're getting this stuff mixed up with the magnetic liquid armour currently in development. It goes rigid when an electric current is passed through it, which can be instantly triggered by a bullet impact. 'How Stuff Works' has an article on it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2006
  5. Aug 21, 2006 #4

    DaveC426913

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    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  6. Aug 21, 2006 #5

    LURCH

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    The substance to which you refer is one form of liquid body armor (magnetorheological), d30 is the other kind. Both are being studied alongside one another but, AFAIK, only d30 has actually been used. They dip Kevlar in the stuff, and the Kevlar weeve holds the liquid in place. When struck by a bullet (or any other sharp impact), the d30 increases the rigidity of the kevlar, which both increases its ability to stop the bullet
    and decreases the injury to the wearer by distributing the force over a broader area. This way, the guy wearing the vest doesn't get that bruising and occassionaly rib-breaking trauma from the vest deforming in a conical shape right where the bullet hit.
     
  7. Aug 21, 2006 #6

    Danger

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    Thanks for the clarification, Lurch. I haven't heard of that before. While I like the idea of the magnetorheological design, I don't like the idea of getting smoked because of a defective battery. :biggrin:
     
  8. Aug 22, 2006 #7

    BobG

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    Let me guess. It's a non-Newtonian dilatent fluid. (Geez, you really can learn something just by watching someone walk on custard :biggrin: )
     
  9. Aug 23, 2006 #8

    LURCH

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    MMMmmmm; non-Newtonian dilatent fluid! :tongue:
     
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