Implicit Differentiation

  • Thread starter manenbu
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  • #1
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Homework Statement



Assume that the following equation define the implicit function y=(x). Find the its derivative:
x2 + 2xy - y2 = a2
y'=?
y''=?

Homework Equations



[tex]\frac{dy}{dx} = -\frac{F_x}{F_y}[/tex]

The Attempt at a Solution



so for the first derivative I express that equation as F = x2 + 2xy - y2 - a2 = 0 and using the rule from above I get:
[tex]y^{'} = -\frac{x+y}{x-y}[/tex] which is correct.
For the second derivative the answer should be:
[tex]y^{''} = \frac{2a^{2}}{(x-y)^{3}}[/tex]
But I don't understand how to get there. Where did the 2a2 come from? the 3 hints to me that I need to make a derivative of the fraction, but I can't seem to get anything useful.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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you can just go through and differentiate everything w.r.t. x

[itex]x^2+2xy-y^2=a^2[/itex]

so, remembering to use the product rule on the second term and the chain rule on the third,

[itex]2x+2y+2x \frac{dy}{dx}-2y \frac{dy}{dx}=0[/itex]

then collect [itex]\frac{dy}{dx}[/itex] terms as follows:

[itex]2(x+y)=2(y-x) \frac{dy}{dx} \Rightarrow \frac{dy}{dx}=y'=\frac{x+y}{y-x}[/itex] which is what you get.

just do the same again to get the second derivative.
 
  • #3
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Ok got it right this time.
Just a few questions - why do you add the differential to the y and not the x?
And in the chain rule - where is it?
Am I correct thinking that the chain rule should be (dy/dx)(dx/dx) which cancels to dy/dx?
 
  • #4
Hootenanny
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Ok got it right this time.
Just a few questions - why do you add the differential to the y and not the x?
And in the chain rule - where is it?
Am I correct thinking that the chain rule should be (dy/dx)(dx/dx) which cancels to dy/dx?
All latentcorpse did, was differentiate the whole expression with respect to x. Explicitly,

[tex]\frac{d}{dx}\left(x^2+2xy-y^2\right)=\frac{d}{dx}a^2[/tex]

[tex]\frac{d}{dx}x^2 + 2\frac{d}{dx}\left(xy\right) - \frac{d}{dx}y^2 = 0[/tex]

Using the product rule on the second term and the chain rule on the final term,

[tex] 2x + 2y\frac{d}{dx}x + 2x\frac{dy}{dx} - \frac{d}{dy}y^2\cdot\frac{dy}{dx} = 0[/tex]

[tex]2x + 2y + 2x\frac{dy}{dx} - 2y\frac{dy}{dx} = 0[/tex]

Do you follow?
 
  • #5
103
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Ok - everything is understood now. Thanks!
 

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