Impossible problem?

  • Thread starter I'm
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  • #1
I'm
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Homework Statement



is( X^2 )y + (Y^2)x = 6, then the second derivative at the point (1,3) is ?

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



I don't see how this is possible, when I plug in 1 and 3 it comes out as 9 = 6 which isn't true. Can someone tell me if this is wrong? or if the problem is written badly?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
lanedance
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fair point, but i get 12

( X^2 )y + (Y^2)x = (1)3 = (3^2)1 = 12
are you maybe missing a factor of 2?
 
  • #3
I'm
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you're right its 12 but how can I solve the problem?
 
  • #4
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you're right its 12 but how can I solve the problem?

Have you tried solving for the second derivative first?
 
  • #5
lanedance
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well as you point out, (1,3) is not a point on the curve defined by
(x^2)y + (y^2)x = 6, so you can't really

can you write the exact question?
 
  • #6
I'm
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Thats the equation I was given.
 
  • #7
lanedance
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it may help if you write the whole question verbatim

but as already said, (1,3) is not a point on the curve defined by (x^2)y + (y^2)x = 6, so the question does not make sense - it is undefined
 

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