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Improving On Nature

  1. Sep 1, 2005 #1
    Geckos, we learned from you, now watch what we humans can really do. :smile:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 2, 2005 #2

    Danger

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    Excellent link, Skeptic. Very interesting.
     
  4. Sep 2, 2005 #3

    Robots are going to be able to go anywhere once they get this adhesive mass produced. :smile:
    I can't wait, but obviously have to, for climbing gloves/boots. :cool:
     
  5. Sep 2, 2005 #4

    Danger

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    And then I'll finally be able to make a Spider-Man suit for Hallowe'en without being cheesy. I've never done it because I couldn't figure out the climbing bit. (Got the web-shooters worked out, though.) Now if someone can advise me on a good, cheap version of 'cold fire', I can get on with the Human Torch and Johnny Blaze. :biggrin:
     
  6. Sep 2, 2005 #5
    Perhaps, we will see all those super heroes for real, in our life time except that they will no more be called as super heroes.
     
  7. Sep 2, 2005 #6
    How did you do the web-shooters; silly string can?

    I'm afraid you'll have to wait on this to simulate how fire looks without the heat.
     
  8. Sep 3, 2005 #7

    Danger

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    :rofl:
    Not exactly. It involves a solenoid-controlled C02 pressure source and segmented canister with a spinning nozzle assembly on the end. It's based upon interface polymerization. When you fire it, you get 3 x 1mm strands of Nylon 6-10 winding around each other at about 200 rpm with a blast of Super Glue down the middle.
    As for the fire, there's cold fire available now, and I have the instructions for making it. Essentially, it's just alcohol and water mixed. The problem is that it produces a virtually invisible flame.
     
  9. Sep 3, 2005 #8

    Astronuc

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    May be add a little NaCl (or other Na compound) to the water. Sodium is emits yellow when burning.
     
  10. Sep 4, 2005 #9
    Have you actually made a prototype, or it's just on paper? I'd suggest you make a physical working model to test out if the later is the case. For one reason of another things sometimes don't work in reality just like you think they will. Some version of what you describe would probably work however.
    Question though, what makes the nylon spiral cord stick to what you shoot it at? The superglue? I don't know about you, but I wouldn't trust my life to patch of superglue that's only say 5mm by 5mm. Superglue isn't that super.
     
  11. Sep 8, 2005 #10

    So the cold fire is actually chemicals that are rapidly oxidizing? How does this cold fire work without heat?
     
  12. Sep 10, 2005 #11

    Danger

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    Or maybe pure sodium for a slightly warmer flame? :uhh:
    Thanks, Astro... I'll look into it, as long as it doesn't bring the temperature above about 80ºC. I don't want anyone getting burned when I'm dancing.

    On paper for now. There are some technical difficulties that I haven't worked out yet. I can make a really simplified version without spinners for the chemical testing bit. Depending upon which specific agents I use, there might be byproducts that need to be chemically neutralized before ejection. The major mechanical problem is how to make the spinnaret head cut the strands at shut-off, and not clog up doing so, since the polymerization is a self-sustaining reaction. Also, getting the nozzle angles right will be trial and error; they have to be offset enough to make it spin, and yet still maintain a reasonable coherence among the strands.

    I don't plan to be swinging around the city on it. :biggrin: It's designed as a short-range anti-mugging device. I can't imagine that it will ever be able to shoot more than a couple of metres. The idea is to tangle a guy up to disable him (and maybe glue his nose and mouth shut if I'm really annoyed with him).
     
  13. Sep 12, 2005 #12

    Ah.
    Not that I want to take the wind out of your sails but, what's wrong with pepper spray?

    Hmmm, how to make a real building swinging device? I have an idea, make a custom gun-like thing that uses the pressure from a blank gun shell to propell a "piton" patch of this newly made super setae adhesive. A carbon nanotube fiber cord would connect the piton to the gun, and be reeled back up via a high torque electric motor(or a high speed motor with some gearing to exchange speed for pulling ability).

    I worked out the math on this new adhesive. Natural gecko setae have a practical strength(because only about a tenth of the number of the gecko's setae come in contact with the surface at a given time) of about 2kg per 1.8cm in diameter patch. Times that by 200 equals 400kg!
     
  14. Sep 20, 2005 #13

    Danger

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    I'm still awaiting trial over someone's objection to my .45, and mace or pepper spray are equally as illegal where I live. I'm trying to bypass laws.
    I have to go to work right away, but will get back to this whenever I can manage to get computer time again.
     
  15. Sep 20, 2005 #14
    Oh, I didn't know it was for serious use. You're a cop? What about electrical weapons, you know, tasers, stun guns, electrical stun batons etc.? This is still being developed, but should be great when they can be bought. I want one, no doubt.
     
  16. Sep 20, 2005 #15

    Danger

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    Not a cop, but I've worked for RCMP and CSIS a couple of times. Mainly, I'm just a firm believer that it's better to have a gun and not need one than to need one and not have it. Tasers, believe it or not, are even more illegal than guns here. I was looking into the 'fluid' Taser, which is like a double-barrel water pistol firing twin streams of conductive fluid. I don't have time to read the link that you provided right now, but it looks very interesting at a quick scan. Maybe I'll see about building one. (Incidentally, one of the modifications of the web-shooters that I've been contemplating is introducing conductive material to the polymer and adding a Taser circuit. Maintaining contact with 2 strands on separate polarities through the spinarette assembly is going to be a new nightmare in itself.)
    Thanks very much for providing that link. I'll look into it in more depth when I have a chance.
     
  17. Sep 21, 2005 #16
    A web shooter! I want one! Can't use mace/pepper spray here either.
     
  18. Sep 21, 2005 #17
    Oh, I never put anything past human stupidity; It really knows no bounds. Tasers are only a threat if the person who's shot is on meth, coke etc. If they won't listen to the cop and die from being shot by the taser, it's their own damn fault.
     
  19. Sep 22, 2005 #18

    Danger

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    Hi hon;
    If I ever get it working properly, I'll send you one (or the blueprints if it's really expensive).

    Agreed. In fact, the Calgary force is just introducing them to their arsenal right now (1 per car). RCMP have had them for a couple of years. They're categorized as 'Prohibited Weapons' here, which puts them in the same class as full-auto guns, switchblades, suppressors, grenades, etc.. Handguns, other than .32's or under 4" barrelled, ones are 'Restricted Weapons'. Regardless of how painful it is, I'd rather be shot with a Taser than a .40 Glock.
     
  20. Sep 22, 2005 #19
    Put me down for one also.

    Now if someone will get around to making a real version of Dr. Otto Octavious' four robotic arms I'll be happier.
    :smile:
     
  21. Sep 22, 2005 #20

    Danger

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    I'll get on that right away. :rolleyes:
    Actually gave it some thought about 30 years ago. It wasn't practical at the time, but with micromachines...
     
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