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Impulse Gravity Generator Based on Charged YBa_2Cu_3O_{7-y} Superconductor

  1. Aug 24, 2003 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Assuming that this must be controversial at best, I am posting FYI.

    Impulse Gravity Generator Based on Charged YBa_2Cu_3O_{7-y} Superconductor with Composite Crystal Structure

    http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/physics/0108005
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 24, 2003 #2
    Ivan,
    Were you conducting tests with one
    of these? Is that why the site
    was down all evening?


    This is mighty peculiar. How is
    it they're comparing it to grav-
    ity? It seems to be a "push" ray.

    In any event, if it's for real
    it could lead to some extrordina-
    ry technology.
     
  4. Aug 24, 2003 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    Pretty interesting indeed. I would have expected to hear something about this by now; of course it is only a couple of years old. I have never searched for additional information about this as yet.
     
  5. Aug 24, 2003 #4

    Ivan Seeking

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    The key statement is:
    This implies a gravity related phenomenon; but as you said, in the wrong direction.
     
  6. Aug 24, 2003 #5
    Ivan,

    I went to the site and looked at
    the diagrams of the aparatus and
    it doesn't seem as exiting as it
    did at first. It's looking like
    there are two sort of Van de Graff
    thingies between which this effect
    takes place. In other words, not
    a ray at all, but simply a high
    potential/low potential situation.

    No space ship propulsion that I
    can see. Take a look, maybe you
    can make more sence out of it.

    zoob
     
  7. Aug 24, 2003 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    The claim is the repeatable measurement of "mass dependent anomalous forces". These people know how to account for additional forces; not to say however that they might not be in error. However, electric forces will not act purely as a function of mass. Also, that this is a follow up [yielding improved results] should indicate that some degree of peer review has already taken place.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2003
  8. Aug 25, 2003 #7
    THis guy published the same type of thing a decade ago. A company in the US gave him a ton of money and he couldn't reproduce the results.

    jmd
     
  9. Aug 25, 2003 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    Well I am sure that if we just gave him enough money it would work eventually.

    Too bad. It sounded interesting. I was wondering why nothing else had shown up in the lit about this.

    What happened to the process of peer review? Wouldn't other professors review his work before he was given another grant?

    Also, are you sure that these are not the results sought by the original funding? He does mention some previous, less significant results.
     
  10. Aug 25, 2003 #9
     
  11. Aug 25, 2003 #10
    Unfortunately this isn't always the case especially for government/military/nasa research. This could just as easily happen in research funded by a private corperation.

    Without the proper peer review process it can be very tempting to report a negative result as inconclusive and requiring further invesitgation. Especially because otherwise is basically telling who's paying you to fire you.
     
  12. Aug 30, 2003 #11
    Gravity generator or not what amazes me is that anything should repel at all.
     
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