Impulse Gravity Generator Based on Charged YBa_2Cu_3O_{7-y} Superconductor

Ivan Seeking

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,093
174
Assuming that this must be controversial at best, I am posting FYI.

Impulse Gravity Generator Based on Charged YBa_2Cu_3O_{7-y} Superconductor with Composite Crystal Structure

The detection of apparent anomalous forces in the vicinity of high-Tc superconductors under non equilibrium conditions has stimulated an experimental research in which the operating parameters of the experiment have been pushed to values higher than those employed in previous attempts. The results confirm the existence of an unexpected physical interaction. An apparatus has been constructed and tested in which the superconductor is subjected to peak currents in excess of 10^4 A, surface potentials in excess of 1 MV, trapped magnetic field up to 1 T, and temperature down to 40 K. In order to produce the required currents a high voltage discharge technique has been employed. Discharges originating from a superconducting ceramic electrode are accompanied by the emission of radiation which propagates in a focused beam without noticeable attenuation through different materials and exerts a short repulsive force on small movable objects along the propagation axis. Within the measurement error (5 to 7 %) the impulse is proportional to the mass of the objects and independent on their composition. It therefore resembles a gravitational impulse. The observed phenomenon appears to be absolutely new and unprecedented in the literature. It cannot be understood in the framework of general relativity. A theory is proposed which combines a quantum gravity approach with anomalous vacuum fluctuations.
http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/physics/0108005
 
6,171
1,275
Ivan,
Were you conducting tests with one
of these? Is that why the site
was down all evening?


This is mighty peculiar. How is
it they're comparing it to grav-
ity? It seems to be a "push" ray.

In any event, if it's for real
it could lead to some extrordina-
ry technology.
 

Ivan Seeking

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,093
174
Originally posted by zoobyshoe
Ivan,
Were you conducting tests with one
of these? Is that why the site
was down all evening?[/B]


This is mighty peculiar. How is
it they're comparing it to grav-
ity? It seems to be a "push" ray.

In any event, if it's for real
it could lead to some extrordina-
ry technology.
Pretty interesting indeed. I would have expected to hear something about this by now; of course it is only a couple of years old. I have never searched for additional information about this as yet.
 

Ivan Seeking

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,093
174
Originally posted by zoobyshoe
How is it they're comparing it to gravity? It seems to be a "push" ray.
The key statement is:
the impulse is proportional to the mass of the objects and independent on their composition
This implies a gravity related phenomenon; but as you said, in the wrong direction.
 
6,171
1,275
Ivan,

I went to the site and looked at
the diagrams of the aparatus and
it doesn't seem as exiting as it
did at first. It's looking like
there are two sort of Van de Graff
thingies between which this effect
takes place. In other words, not
a ray at all, but simply a high
potential/low potential situation.

No space ship propulsion that I
can see. Take a look, maybe you
can make more sence out of it.

zoob
 

Ivan Seeking

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,093
174
Originally posted by zoobyshoe
Ivan,

I went to the site and looked at
the diagrams of the aparatus and
it doesn't seem as exiting as it
did at first. It's looking like
there are two sort of Van de Graff
thingies between which this effect
takes place. In other words, not
a ray at all, but simply a high
potential/low potential situation.

No space ship propulsion that I
can see. Take a look, maybe you
can make more sence out of it.

zoob
The claim is the repeatable measurement of "mass dependent anomalous forces". These people know how to account for additional forces; not to say however that they might not be in error. However, electric forces will not act purely as a function of mass. Also, that this is a follow up [yielding improved results] should indicate that some degree of peer review has already taken place.
 
Last edited:
418
3
THis guy published the same type of thing a decade ago. A company in the US gave him a ton of money and he couldn't reproduce the results.

jmd
 

Ivan Seeking

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,093
174
Originally posted by nbo10
THis guy published the same type of thing a decade ago. A company in the US gave him a ton of money and he couldn't reproduce the results.

jmd
Well I am sure that if we just gave him enough money it would work eventually.

Too bad. It sounded interesting. I was wondering why nothing else had shown up in the lit about this.

What happened to the process of peer review? Wouldn't other professors review his work before he was given another grant?

Also, are you sure that these are not the results sought by the original funding? He does mention some previous, less significant results.
 
6,171
1,275
Originally posted by Ivan Seeking
Well I am sure that if we just gave him enough money it would work eventually.


This is true. Or you could give
me the grant money and I could
push an object or two around on
a table top for a few minutes
every day.
 
Originally posted by Ivan Seeking

What happened to the process of peer review? Wouldn't other professors review his work before he was given another grant?
Unfortunately this isn't always the case especially for government/military/nasa research. This could just as easily happen in research funded by a private corperation.

Without the proper peer review process it can be very tempting to report a negative result as inconclusive and requiring further invesitgation. Especially because otherwise is basically telling who's paying you to fire you.
 

jammieg

Gravity generator or not what amazes me is that anything should repel at all.
 

Related Threads for: Impulse Gravity Generator Based on Charged YBa_2Cu_3O_{7-y} Superconductor

Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
551
Replies
19
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
564
Replies
8
Views
7K
Replies
5
Views
3K

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top