In a vacuum

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

If all the air is removed from, say a room-sized vacuum, is the air pressure inside the room zero?

and if so, would a human burst like a balloon (the opposite effect of being crushed by an extreme amount of pressure) if put in such a situation? is it similar to the conditions an astronaut would experience outside of the space shuttle?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Cyosis
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No you wouldn't burst. Your skin is strong enough to keep you together. It is similar to the pressure of space yes, but an astronaut in space is getting radiated and is subject to extreme temperature differentials.

This may be of interest to you for a little bit more detail: http://en.allexperts.com/q/Popular-Science-357/Space-suit.htm [Broken]
 
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  • #3
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Thank Cyosis for the link.

Does this mean that we would freeze faster in an air filled freezer than in a radiation free vacuum due to the air molecules allowing greater heat transfer?
 
  • #4
Cyosis
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I cannot answer your question with certainty. It will certainly depend on the temperature in the freezer. That said there are three methods of transferring heat away from your body, conduction, convection and radiation. In space you will only be able to transfer heat by radiating.
 

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