1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

In an electric field

  1. Jul 10, 2013 #1
    Hello, in an electric field, are the magnitudes of the field the same regardless of the spatial location? Or is the field's magnitude similar to the force experienced by the test charge where it gets smaller as you move away from the source charge? Any clarification would be appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 10, 2013 #2

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    By definition: The magnitude of the field is the same as the magnitude of the force experienced by a test charge with a charge q, divided by q. (The direction is the same as the force experienced by a positive test charge.)

    i.e. we write: ##\vec{E} = \vec{F}/q##

    In general, the magnitude of the field varies from place to place.
    You should be able to tell this - if the field were the same no matter where you were then how would it be useful?
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2013
  4. Jul 10, 2013 #3

    rude man

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    The test charge must be arbitrarily small so as not to affect the E field being measured. So really E = lim q → 0 of F/q.
     
  5. Jul 10, 2013 #4

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: In an electric field
Loading...