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In Honor of our Fallen Heroes

  1. Apr 3, 2008 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    No matter how one feels about the Iraq war, I think everyone here supports our men and women who put everything at risk to do their sworn duty and/or what they believe needs to be done in the service of their country.

    To be awarded a Medal of Honor this week: Petty Officer Second Class (SEAL) Michael A. Monsoor

    http://www.navy.mil/moh/monsoor/SOA.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2008
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 3, 2008 #2
    That's what our Navy Seals are made of. True hereos. Of 300 tough young soldiers who volunteer to try out for Navy Seal training, 20 or so make it. Best of the best. This is an example of the type of young men that make a Seal team.

    RIP
     
  4. Apr 7, 2008 #3

    chemisttree

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    DUNHAM, JASON L.

    Rank and Organization: Corporal, United States Marine Corps
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Rifle Squad Leader, 4th Platoon, Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines (Reinforced), Regimental Combat Team 7, First Marine Division (Reinforced), on 14 April 2004. Corporal Dunham's squad was conducting a reconnaissance mission in the town of Karabilah, Iraq, when they heard rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fire erupt approximately two kilometers to the west. Corporal Dunham led his Combined Anti-Armor Team towards the engagement to provide fire support to their Battalion Commander's convoy, which had been ambushed as it was traveling to Camp Husaybah. As Corporal Dunham and his Marines advanced, they quickly began to receive enemy fire. Corporal Dunham ordered his squad to dismount their vehicles and led one of his fire teams on foot several blocks south of the ambushed convoy. Discovering seven Iraqi vehicles in a column attempting to depart, Corporal Dunham and his team stopped the vehicles to search them for weapons. As they approached the vehicles, an insurgent leaped out and attacked Corporal Dunham. Corporal Dunham wrestled the insurgent to the ground and in the ensuing struggle saw the insurgent release a grenade. Corporal Dunham immediately alerted his fellow Marines to the threat. Aware of the imminent danger and without hesitation, Corporal Dunham covered the grenade with his helmet and body, bearing the brunt of the explosion and shielding his Marines from the blast. In an ultimate and selfless act of bravery in which he was mortally wounded, he saved the lives of at least two fellow Marines. By his undaunted courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Dunham gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
     
  5. Apr 7, 2008 #4

    chemisttree

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    SMITH, PAUL R.

    Rank and Organization: Sergeant First Class, United States Army
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:Sergeant First Class Paul R. Smith distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action with an armed enemy near Baghdad International Airport, Baghdad, Iraq on 4 April 2003. On that day, Sergeant First Class Smith was engaged in the construction of a prisoner of war holding area when his Task Force was violently attacked by a company-sized enemy force. Realizing the vulnerability of over 100 fellow soldiers, Sergeant First Class Smith quickly organized a hasty defense consisting of two platoons of soldiers, one Bradley Fighting Vehicle and three armored personnel carriers. As the fight developed, Sergeant First Class Smith braved hostile enemy fire to personally engage the enemy with hand grenades and anti-tank weapons, and organized the evacuation of three wounded soldiers from an armored personnel carrier struck by a rocket propelled grenade and a 60mm mortar round. Fearing the enemy would overrun their defenses, Sergeant First Class Smith moved under withering enemy fire to man a .50 caliber machine gun mounted on a damaged armored personnel carrier. In total disregard for his own life, he maintained his exposed position in order to engage the attacking enemy force. During this action, he was mortally wounded. His courageous actions helped defeat the enemy attack, and resulted in as many as 50 enemy soldiers killed, while allowing the safe withdrawal of numerous wounded soldiers. Sergeant First Class Smith’s extraordinary heroism and uncommon valor are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Third Infantry Division “Rock of the Marne,” and the United States Army.
     
  6. Apr 7, 2008 #5

    lisab

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    Major William Hall, USMC

    A local man, career Marine from Seattle. Died about a week ago, March 30, from wounds suffered in combat.

    http://www.defenselink.mil/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=11803

    http://www.legacy.com/bostonglobe/GB/GuestBookView.aspx?PersonID=106868476

    His death was especially poignant to me because on Saturday, I went to our district caucus as a delegate. As we were going through the process of electing which delegates we would send to the next level (state convention), a letter was read in proxy from a woman who could not be there in person. She was Major Hall's aunt, and was attending his service. The letter was very moving, very sad.

    She got my vote.
     
  7. Apr 7, 2008 #6

    Evo

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    Excellent thread Ivan, so nice to see something positive said about our soldiers for a change.

    My younger daughter's best friend and my "son" (he adopted me as his mother) is in the Marines and stationed in Iraq. I don't understand why he did it. He named his gun after me, which makes me a bit sad, he said it would bring him good luck. I worry about him all of the time.
     
  8. Apr 7, 2008 #7

    mheslep

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    Id like to add Navy Seal, Lt. Michael Murphy, in Afghanistan
    Citation:
    Rank and Organization: Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, SEAL. Place and date: Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan, 27-28 June 2005. Entered service at: Patchogue, NY. Born: 7 May, 1976, Smithtown, NY. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as the leader of a special reconnaissance element with Naval Special Warfare Task Unit Afghanistan on 27 and 28 June 2005. While leading a mission to locate a high-level anti-coalition militia leader, Lieutenant Murphy demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the face of grave danger in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. On 28 June 2005, operating in an extremely rugged enemy-controlled area, Lieutenant Murphy’s team was discovered by anti-coalition militia sympathizers who revealed their position to Taliban fighters. As a result, between 30 and 40 enemy fighters besieged his four-member team. Demonstrating exceptional resolve, Lieutenant Murphy valiantly led his men in engaging the large enemy force. The ensuing fierce firefight resulted in numerous enemy casualties, as well as the wounding of all four members of the team. Ignoring his own wounds and demonstrating exceptional composure, Lieutenant Murphy continued to lead and encourage his men. When the primary communicator fell mortally wounded, Lieutenant Murphy repeatedly attempted to call for assistance for his beleaguered teammates. Realizing the impossibility of communicating in the extreme terrain, and in the face of almost certain death, he fought his way into open terrain to gain a better position to transmit a call. This deliberate, heroic act deprived him of cover, exposing him to direct enemy fire. Finally achieving contact with his headquarters, Lieutenant Murphy maintained his exposed position while he provided his location and requested immediate support for his team. In his final act of bravery, he continued to engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country and for the cause of freedom. By his selfless leadership, courageous actions, and extraordinary devotion to duty, Lieutenant Murphy reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
    Photo:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_p_murphy
    Book on the incident: Lone Survivor
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2008
  9. Apr 12, 2008 #8
    The courage and sacrifice of these men are unbelievable to me. I am humbled by their greatness.
     
  10. Apr 13, 2008 #9

    mheslep

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    Arg. that is of course Lt Michael Murphy above, not Moore.
     
  11. Apr 13, 2008 #10
    I read about this last week. No joke, it made my eyes water. True heroes.
     
  12. May 2, 2008 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    Marine Sgt. Merlin German
    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2008/05/02/2008-05-02_after_150_surgeries_shocking_loss_of_her.html
     
  13. May 8, 2008 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    It was announced today that a Battleship will be named in Murphy's honor.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 13, 2008
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