In need of college advice.

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In summary: I want to go to college. In summary, my friend told me that if I remove my applications from other colleges then I'm screwed because I can't afford to go to that school.
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I'm considering a degree in some sort of physics, possibly Astrophysics, but I was already accepted at a fairly nice college nearby for game design and development. I applied on early admissions because that was the only way to get in, according to representatives I spoke to. My friend informed me that because I was accepted on early admissions that means that I have to remove all my applications to other college and if so I'm screwed because I cannot afford to go to that school questioning my degree.

My main reasons for taking an interest in physics is because I want to know how the universe works, where it came from, and where it is going. Plus I don't feel that extreme "push" for game design that I used to. Probably the main thing that scares me about majoring in physics is the work load, I have been pretty relaxed in high school. I had a lot of study halls my first two years and now in my senior year I'm finally trying to apply myself and I'm taking more AP classes. It is supposed to prepare me for college but it just doesn't feel like college. I don't know if I would be mentally prepared for the workload that would come with a degree in physics. The largest problem being that I haven't developed good study skills or good time management yet.

In short; Is early admissions a "binding" contract? How overwhelming is the workload in the physics degree? And what are some good study habits/ time management skills that you have?
 
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  • #2
PhysiCalc said:
In short; Is early admissions a "binding" contract?
It's supposed to be. You were admitted with the understanding that you were going to attend there if accepted and nowhere else. I don't really understand applying ED when you know the potential costs involved beforehand and decided you couldn't afford it.

http://youngadults.about.com/od/collegeprep/qt/Breakingbinding.htm

How overwhelming is the workload in the physics degree?
As with most things in life, it is what you make of it. Your "relaxed" work ethic will probably not result in very good grades.

And what are some good study habits/ time management skills that you have?
Er... don't waste time?
 
  • #3
PhysiCalc said:
In short; Is early admissions a "binding" contract?
No. You likely have lost your application fee, but that's about it. I'm not sure where your friend is getting his information, but that's wrong. The only possible exceptions that I can think of might be if this school is a military academy and you've signed an agreement for so many years of service. Otherwise, just apply to the places you want to go.

How overwhelming is the workload in the physics degree?
This is a subjective question with an answer that will vary from person to person. I worked damned hard through my undergraduate degree and quite honestly felt overwhelmed at times. Others worked harder or did worse, while still others more-or-less breezed through (or at least so it seemed) with top marks.

And what are some good study habits/ time management skills that you have?
- make use of office hours and ask for help when you need it
- take time to explore at least a little where your own interests fall
- read up and prepare for labs ahead of time
- try to read ahead so that lectures are time for clarification and discussion rather than simple introduction of material
- be very conscious of time spent on unimportant activities like video games, television or mindless internet surfing
- get good, regular amounts of sleep and exercise and pay attention to diet and nutrition - these will help you be more productive when you do sit down to study
- try as much as possible to surround yourself socially with helpful, positive people who have similar goals
 
  • #4
fss said:
It's supposed to be. You were admitted with the understanding that you were going to attend there if accepted and nowhere else. I don't really understand applying ED when you know the potential costs involved beforehand and decided you couldn't afford it.

http://youngadults.about.com/od/collegeprep/qt/Breakingbinding.htm
Choppy said:
No. You likely have lost your application fee, but that's about it. I'm not sure where your friend is getting his information, but that's wrong. The only possible exceptions that I can think of might be if this school is a military academy and you've signed an agreement for so many years of service. Otherwise, just apply to the places you want to go.

Ah I see, I can break it but it will look really bad for me.

I can't deny that my work ethic is going to need a large overhaul for college, thank you both for the advice.

About:
- get good, regular amounts of sleep and exercise and pay attention to diet and nutrition - these will help you be more productive when you do sit down to study

I'm doing pretty bad on all of those factors. Sleep and diet I can see how important it is, but how important is exercise(that would be the most difficult one to change)?
 
  • #5
PhysiCalc said:
Ah I see, I can break it but it will look really bad for me.

I can't deny that my work ethic is going to need a large overhaul for college, thank you both for the advice.

About:

I'm doing pretty bad on all of those factors. Sleep and diet I can see how important it is, but how important is exercise(that would be the most difficult one to change)?

Exercise is essential for improvement in mental function, for instance long term memory recall, etc, which is undoubtedly useful in studies.

See here: http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/exercise.html etc.
 
  • #6
bleedblue1234 said:
Exercise is essential for improvement in mental function, for instance long term memory recall, etc, which is undoubtedly useful in studies.

See here: http://www.fi.edu/learn/brain/exercise.html etc.

Okay I'll be exercising more now xD, in that article they said utilizing two senses at the same time would be a very good way to strengthen your brain. So would listening to music while walking or riding a bike be an example of that? Also they focus mostly on walking and running in that article, would any cardiovascular exercise have the same effect?
 
  • #7
PhysiCalc said:
Okay I'll be exercising more now xD, in that article they said utilizing two senses at the same time would be a very good way to strengthen your brain. So would listening to music while walking or riding a bike be an example of that? Also they focus mostly on walking and running in that article, would any cardiovascular exercise have the same effect?

Yes I believe cardiovascular exercise is the most important for mental function/abilities, but strength training should not be neglected (especially since it boosts confidence). Personally I like running while reading a book on the treadmill, or walking/running in the woods just to nature. Mix it up a bit.

By utilizing two senses (for instance feeling an object while seeing and hearing it) it makes it much easier to remember because the multiple connections made. So, if you are reviewing notes it's best to both read them aloud and look over them, rather than simply reading them (which is a pretty horrible way to study). The best way to review material is to "teach" it to either a mock class or one of your friends, and if you can do that you are golden.
 
  • #8
bleedblue1234 said:
Yes I believe cardiovascular exercise is the most important for mental function/abilities, but strength training should not be neglected (especially since it boosts confidence). Personally I like running while reading a book on the treadmill, or walking/running in the woods just to nature. Mix it up a bit.

By utilizing two senses (for instance feeling an object while seeing and hearing it) it makes it much easier to remember because the multiple connections made. So, if you are reviewing notes it's best to both read them aloud and look over them, rather than simply reading them (which is a pretty horrible way to study). The best way to review material is to "teach" it to either a mock class or one of your friends, and if you can do that you are golden.

Okay that makes a lot of sense. My best class at the moment is AP Calculus and that may be because I end up having to teach it to my friends because I guess they can't follow the teacher. Thank you for the advice.
 

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