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I In which field can relativity theory be classified?

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  1. Mar 11, 2016 #1
    I want to know in which context should i take relativity with both general and special .
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 11, 2016 #2

    jtbell

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    I'm sorry, I don't understand your question, and I suspect nobody else will, either. Can you explain it further?
     
  4. Mar 11, 2016 #3

    phinds

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    I certainly don't.
     
  5. Mar 11, 2016 #4

    HallsofIvy

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    What do you mean by "context"?
     
  6. Mar 12, 2016 #5
    Is it classified in Quantum Mechanics or Classical Mechanics ?
     
  7. Mar 12, 2016 #6

    ZapperZ

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    Why does this matter so much?

    BTW, it is not Quantum Mechanics.

    Zz.
     
  8. Mar 12, 2016 #7

    mfb

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    Relativity is its own field. It is neither classical mechanics nor quantum mechanics.
     
  9. Mar 12, 2016 #8
    Why relativity is an independant field ?
     
  10. Mar 12, 2016 #9

    mfb

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    Because it is neither classical mechanics nor quantum mechanics...
     
  11. Mar 12, 2016 #10

    phinds

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    Hm. This post seems to have been edited such that it appears to be a response to mfg, which is was not. I'm going to delete the content to avoid confusion.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2016
  12. Mar 12, 2016 #11
    i think you wish to know whether 'quantum' ideas can be incorporated in relativity whether its STR or GTR- i think till the quantization of 'graviton'
    or discovery of a particle which can mediate /connect the action of 'gravity field' or say 'quantization of gravitation' does not come up -it can not be said to be a part of quantum physics.
    so its a classical theory encompassing the four dimensional space-time.-where time has been given a special status of coordinates and forces are derived from the curvature of space-time fabric.
     
  13. Mar 12, 2016 #12

    phinds

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    but you need to be clear that you are not telling him that it is classical mechanics.
     
  14. Mar 12, 2016 #13

    PeterDonis

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    How are you defining "Classical Mechanics"? Some people define it as "everything that isn't Quantum Mechanics", in which case SR and GR would both be "Classical". But that's not a very informative definition.

    The more common definition, which is the one the other posters are using, defines "Classical Mechanics" to mean Newtonian mechanics: Newton's three laws of motion and his law of gravity. SR and GR are not "Classical Mechanics" by this definition; they are "Relativistic Mechanics", which is a separate field of its own.
     
  15. Mar 12, 2016 #14
    well sorry -i should have said that
    its a classical theory but not 'classical mechanics' as its a development based on space-time description of events so its treated outside mechanics- but relativistic dynamics is 'classical'..
     
  16. Mar 12, 2016 #15
    Thank you very much !
     
  17. Mar 16, 2016 #16

    vanhees71

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    This I don't understand either. Relativity is an unfortunate name for "space-time model". So it's comprehensive for all of physics, classical and quantum. The special theory is an approximation to the general in neglecting gravity.
     
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