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Independent research

  1. Jun 24, 2007 #1
    hey everyone,

    I first started doing independent research myself, exploring topics myself, but how do I do "offical" research that counts towards college admissions (I am a high school student by the way).


    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 24, 2007 #2
    publish something
     
  4. Jun 24, 2007 #3

    G01

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    Now come on. How does this help the original poster? You did notice he said he was in high school right? He was asking for real advice, not for someone to mock him...

    To the OP:

    If you are still in high school, it will be hard to find a good, high school level, project on a topic if you don't have some guidance, since there is much that may go over the head of a high school student. I don't mean this to be insulting, there is still tons that goes over my head as a college student! I would go to your physics teacher. See if he or she has some kind of extra credit project you can work on. Something like this can help to reinforce what you have learned in class and also look good on a college application. Also, if you school has a team such as a Science Olympiad Team, get involved! These also look good on applications, and are pretty fun when you get down to it! Good Luck to you!
     
  5. Jun 24, 2007 #4
    i've done a bunch of independent research (various fields: cs, engineering, etc). I'm currently working on some cs/applied math stuff. i can help you out if you have any questions: how to start, etc. btw i'm also a high school student
     
  6. Jun 24, 2007 #5
    he said he wants research that will count towards admittance to college? obviously he can put whatever he wants on his application but i don't see how you could do any kind of research that is recognized for anything without doing what all other meaningful researchers do, publish.
     
  7. Jun 24, 2007 #6

    robphy

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    What kind of research?

    Enter a science competition:
    Some examples that came up while googling:
    https://www.physicsforums.com/blog/2007/03/15/intel-science-talent-search-2007-winners/
    http://www.usfirst.org/

    Contact university-sponsored programs for high-school students.
    Some examples that came up while googling:
    http://york.cuny.edu/~malk/high-school-research/high-school-research.html
    http://www.rockefeller.edu/outreach/
    http://www.mdibl.org/edu/highschool.shtml
    http://greenvilleonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070618/NEWS01/706180308/1004/NEWS01

    It's not unreasonable to suggest that a high-school student can try to publish an article.
    An example that came up while googling:
    http://biology.nebrwesleyan.edu/empiricist/default.html
     
  8. Jun 24, 2007 #7

    Math Is Hard

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    How about a program similar to this:
    http://www.jax.org/education/ssp.html
    There must be more programs like this around the U.S. (I'm assuming that's where you live.)
    I think participation in something like this would look great on a college admission application -- especially if it involves an essay in which you could talk about your experience.

    edit: Looks like robphy beat me!
     
  9. Jun 24, 2007 #8

    G01

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    Hmmm, I didn't know that publishing in high school was really that likely to happen. I didn't know stuff like this existed.
     
  10. Jun 24, 2007 #9
    hey strings,

    what year are you in currently? do you live by any big research universities? if so, get in touch with one of the research universities or a national lab and see if any of them will allow you to research under them. maybe you can parlay this into entering into the Intel science fair or the Westinghouse science fair. If you can enter into these contests, you have a great shot at Ivy Leagues and other top tier schools.

    Talk to your teachers and talk to your math or physics department. They will have some kind of connection and should be able to help you out.

    Good luck kid!
     
  11. Jun 24, 2007 #10
    well i live close to cal tech but i'm not exactly sure how to contact them. do i just email them saying i'm interested in doing a research project there?
     
  12. Jun 24, 2007 #11
    go over there and start asking questions, talk to people, wander around.
     
  13. Jun 24, 2007 #12

    Math Is Hard

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    What area of research are you interested in?
     
  14. Jun 24, 2007 #13

    Moonbear

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    I'd suggest looking into summer internship programs if you're still early enough in your high school years to apply for one. I don't know what Cal Tech offers specifically, but may colleges offer programs for high school students to spend some time working with faculty on a small project. The experience is good for your college applications, as are the letters of reference if you do really well, and of course, if nothing else, you'll benefit from seeing what that career/educational option is really like if you were to pursue further education in that field. It's too late this year for those, since they're all already underway and about halfway done, but you can think about it for next year.
     
  15. Jun 24, 2007 #14

    Math Is Hard

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    http://www.jisan.org/studentinformation/student_introduction/student_introduction.htm

    The Jisan Research Institute provides a remarkable and unparalleled opportunity for high school and extremely talented pre-high school students. Science carried out at JRI may be undertaken primarily by high school students under the supervision of one or more Research Mentors. This allows the students to play an integral part in designing the research program, developing the research, analyzing data, and writing up and publishing the results. Such control over a research program allows a student to grow into a true scientist, and to become an expert in the field of study.
     
  16. Jun 24, 2007 #15
    omg...thats just what have been looking for...:surprised

    do you know how hard the admission is?
     
  17. Jun 25, 2007 #16
    i know plenty of other research programs you can apply to as well. what year are you in high school again?
     
  18. Jun 25, 2007 #17
    going into senior year. I do have friend who is going to be a junior who also is very interested in science. Anything for him as well? lol

    but again. how difficult is the admission--if it's something like RSI where only 75 people internationally are going to make it, then its not a wise choice to invest time looking into it.
     
  19. Jun 25, 2007 #18
    just another note, as a general rule of thumb, most any research program outside of your own school/university is generally not easy to get into. even math/physics summer research programs for undergrads, frequently called REU's aren't very easy to get into even at smaller more unkown universities.

    i think the easiest path for you is so get involved with your high school's department, really work hard under them next year, excelling in all your courses and showing the desire to go the extra mile. this allows them to see what you are capable of and maybe even reccomend you to a national lab or a university research program. if that doesn't work, they can at least write you a great letter of reccomendation next year when you will be applying to research programs for high school students.

    and believe me, letters of reccomendation are crucial, they are the most important thing i believe.
     
  20. Mar 26, 2009 #19
    FYI: Here's a bit of information about the Jisan Research Institute.

    The Jisan Research Institute is designed to be accessible to every student who wants to participate in research. The point of the lab is to help students find their way into careers in science, technology, and medicine. So far about 70% of students who have gone through the program and graduated have gone on to obtain advanced degrees.

    While it's true that grades and standardized test scores are important, it says much more about a student that he or she has been able to be published in an international scientific conference or journal that is reviewed by other scientists. Jisan gives young people the opportunity to do this on projects they initiate. Jisan scientists can write detailed recommendations about the role of the student in the project from beginning to end, and students typically can describe every part of the project that they did in their applications to college.

    Jisan continues to support students through college and into graduate or medical school (where many JRI alumni end up). This can take the form of recommendations, connections with research opportunities on campus, and assistance in determining what is going wrong in students' classes.

    The most important thing about Jisan is that anyone can participate, unlike most research programs. Students often change from B/C students to A students. The underlying assumption is that if students are given a reason to work hard and helped to know how to learn and study, they'll grow into the successful people they always hoped to become. It seems to work.
     
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