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Indoor vs Outdoor Cat Debate: split from derailed thread

  1. Mar 25, 2006 #1
    Dressing your cats is stupid. Its like putting a collar on them. I'd like to put a collar around your neck that rings all day long. :grumpy: Cats have fur for a reason people.

    Moderator note: This topic has been split from the "if I start dressing up my cat, shoot me" thread since we pretty well derailed it. ~Moonbear
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 26, 2006
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  3. Mar 25, 2006 #2

    Alkatran

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    You put a collar (hopefully with ID) on animals so they don't get confused for a stray. Now, EXPENSIVE collars...
     
  4. Mar 25, 2006 #3
    Depends. My cat never had a collar with an ID. We used to let her out. She could go around town if she wanted for all we care. She always came back home. Cat's don't go 'stray,' dogs do.
     
  5. Mar 25, 2006 #4

    Moonbear

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    I really object to people letting their cats out to roam the neighborhood. Your neighbors who don't own or want cats don't appreciate them using their yard for litter boxes. :grumpy: Plus, they're destructive to the local wildlife (that's a BIG reason I HATED when the neighbors let their cats roam...they would come in MY yard and scare the birds away that I want to enjoy, and they killed the chipmunk that I was happy to let live in my yard. :mad:) It also means they get exposed to other cats and feline diseases, pick up more parasites, chance getting run over by cars, and all sorts of other injuries. If you take the responsibility of adopting a pet, you should care for the pet and not leave it to fend for itself outdoors. And, if I saw a cat without a collar, I DID call to have them picked up as strays (we did have quite a few strays in addition to the pets...probably because the non-neutered pets were allowed to roam too).
     
  6. Mar 25, 2006 #5
    Well, my neighbors had no problems with my cat. She didn't go around killing chipmunks either, we don't have any here. Cat's can fend for themselves. Sometimes she would get into fights with the other cats, but they would just make more noise than anything else. No one called to have cat's taken away where I lived. Our neighbor’s were good enough people to feed any cat's they saw and treat them nice. What do you think cats do moonbear, live indoors all day long? That's like having a bird and keeping it in a cage. Pointless. They don't get parasites either. You check them and take them to the vet. :rolleyes:

    cat's don’t use the yard as litter boxes, they dig holes do their business and burry it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2006
  7. Mar 25, 2006 #6

    Moonbear

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    Not all cats bury very well. But, yes, cats that are pets should be kept indoors. If your home is too small to keep them indoors, then you just shouldn't get a cat as a pet. It's no different than getting a dog as a pet if you don't have room for it to run around your home or yard...you just shouldn't. If you need to impose your pets upon your neighbors, you just shouldn't have that pet.
     
  8. Mar 26, 2006 #7
    Well then moonbear, I disagree with you. An animal is not a toy you keep locked up inside your house. If your house is that small, then yes, you should not have a cat. You are right. I am not imposing my cat on my neighbors, nor do their cats impose on my yard. You seem to forget the cats creed. Sleep all day, go out all night.
     
  9. Mar 26, 2006 #8

    Moonbear

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    Of course a cat is not a toy, that's why I think people should care more about them when they own them than to just toss them outside with no idea where they are going or who they are bothering. I find it to be an imposition to find cat feces in my flower beds when I'm gardening, or to smell that from under my window, or to hear the cats meowing loudly when they are fighting or mating or whatever the heck they're screaming about on my front lawn at 3 or 4 AM as I'm trying to fall asleep on a summer night when I want to keep the windows open for fresh air. If a cat owner doesn't want to take care of their cats, and those cats wind up in my yard, then I'll set the have-a-heart traps and take them to the shelter where someone can adopt them who will care.
     
  10. Mar 26, 2006 #9
    Toss them outside? :uhh:

    My cat would jump on the bed, claw at the window begging to go outside at night. They are called night animals for a reason you know. :rolleyes:

    But you have no problems with cow feces? :rolleyes:


    Unless you have a litter of kittens taking a crap under your window, that's just sensationalism. :uhh:

    My cat took a dump in the house in her litter box, because she preferred it, and it did not smell. I highly doubt you could smell anything from your window from one cat.

    Because we all know cat's meow and fight for hours on end keeping us up. :rolleyes:

    They get into a little fuss with eachother for what, a whole half minute?


    If you want to have a heart, leave it a can of cat food and some water. You will have a nice new friend that will make you happy. :smile:
     
  11. Mar 26, 2006 #10

    Moonbear

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    I don't have random cows wandering into my lawn, do you? Cattle don't stink nearly as badly as cats though.

    Besides, what if your cat is crapping in the yard of a pregnant woman?
    http://health.yahoo.com/topic/pregnancy/healthyhabits/article/noahnet/pregnancy_bby_cat_litter
    As for all your other claims, sorry, but that's all from experience...and it's not just one cat, but a whole neighborhood worth of cats. Yes, they howl for hours for nights in a row (probably mating), and their crap STINKS. See, what you seem to forget is when they defecate in their litter box, you generally clean that quickly, but when it's accumulating outside under a window, and you don't discover it until spring when you open the windows, it's a LOT of stink. And when they've decided that's a good place to keep returning, it doesn't go away. Do you ask random neighbors to clean your litterboxes for you? If you wouldn't do that, why would you expect to turn their yards into litterboxes?

    Actually, you know what, you seem to know so little of what the cats are actually doing when they are out of your care that I'm even more doubting how responsible of a cat owner you could be. I guess it's much easier to just let them make their ruckus and mess in other people's yards than to provide a healthy environment for them in your own home. :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2006
  12. Mar 26, 2006 #11

    Really? What is that called, oh yeah organic fertilizer?


    From your link:

    If you do that, your pretty stupid.

    Wow, seems like common sense to me. :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2006
  13. Mar 26, 2006 #12

    Moonbear

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    And that's already composted, it's not the raw cow flops. Believe me, you wouldn't want those in your lawn either.
     
  14. Mar 26, 2006 #13

    Moonbear

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    Last edited: Mar 26, 2006
  15. Mar 26, 2006 #14
    According to that, YOU are a danger to my cat!! :eek:
     
  16. Mar 26, 2006 #15
    If you are having major problems with cats using places that you don't want them to use there are two solutions that will make them go elsewhere. You can get those humane anti-bird roosting strips (the ones that are plastic spikes) and semi bury them so there is about two to three inches of plastic sticking above the ground. Or get some monofillimant fishing line and make a grid over the area again about two to three inches above the ground. Both of these measures make it so the cat has a hard time squatting, therefore they will go do there business elsewhere.
     
  17. Mar 26, 2006 #16
    slingshots work pretty well too
     
  18. Mar 26, 2006 #17

    Moonbear

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    How about all my cat "owning" neighbors pay for that and the clean-up?

    Cyrus, I'm not a threat to your cat, I would never harm a cat as punishment for the owner's lack of caring. I am a threat to your cat returning home to you though, because, like I said, if it's roaming around uncared for, I'm going to drop it off at the nearest shelter to find someone else better able and willing to care for it. If you really love your cat, keep it indoors, or build an outdoor enclosure it cannot escape from if you want to allow it outside from time to time...and supervise it when it is outside.

    And, according to this, domestic cats are not just a thread to songbird populations, but also to the natural predators of those songbirds that have to compete with domestic cats for their food supply.
    http://www.wnrmag.com/stories/1996/dec96/cats.htm
     
  19. Mar 26, 2006 #18

    Moonbear

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    And what does that do to birds? Wouldn't birds get caught up in the monofilament? I WANT to enjoy the wild birds that are attracted to my gardens, I don't want cat urine killing my plants, or having them digging up the garden, or finding their feces while I'm working in the garden.
     
  20. Mar 26, 2006 #19
    :rofl: Yeah, my lack of caring about my cat, RIGHTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT :rofl: :uhh:

    You still think a cat is a toy that you lock inside your house. Give me a break. Maybe I should put my cat in a helmet with diapers too huh? She might fall down and hurt herself while using the litter box! :rofl:


    So what? My cat is not going to single handedly eliminate the songbird population. To think so is utter nonsense.

    Maybe I should post enough citations about how dangerous it is to walk outside your house. Then I can justify locking you inside your own house 24-7 because its not safe out there. I can even give you a bubble. Yes, you can live in your own protective bubble. How does that sound?
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2006
  21. Mar 26, 2006 #20

    Moonbear

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    No, the loving thing is to keep your cat indoors where it is safe. If you truly were a responsible owner, you'd ensure it was not bored by giving it sufficient attention and toys and other forms of enrichment within the home so it would be happy inside. The decision to own a pet is a serious one, not one to take flippantly. If you cannot provide an adequate environment for that pet, and cannot be bothered to keep them safe, then you have no business being a pet owner. It's like people who get a hamster as a pet and then complain it is making noise on the running wheel at night...what did you expect when you got a nocturnal pet? If your cat is begging to go outside, you are NOT providing enough stimulation for it inside. Teenagers beg to stay out all night too, but caring parents don't allow that either because they know it is unsafe.

    That seems to be a VERY selfish attitude. Yeah, gee, "my" cat won't kill ALL the songbirds, all by itself, so I should just be allowed to let it outside to kill whatever ones it wants to, along with every other cat out there. You and the other 30 million cat owners.

    It sounds like someone is trying to rationalize their actions by throwing out entirely unrelated subjects.
     
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