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Inelastic collision problem

  1. Dec 18, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I am doing this project and it asks me for the before and after velocity of a inelastic collision.

    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I have found the before velocity of both object which is 0 and 15 m/s, however i am trying to find the after velocities right now, the thing is they are not stuck together so their are two speeds. So far i have added my two momentum's to find the total momentum before collision. However, now i am stuck with a solution i cannot find.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 18, 2014 #2
    Have you been given the value of the coefficient of restitution?
     
  4. Dec 19, 2014 #3
    You have two equations , one for conservation of momentum and the other is for conservation of kinetic energy.
    Because the kinetic energy is conserved in the elastic collision.
    From them you can find the final velocities of the two objects.
     
  5. Dec 19, 2014 #4
    By the way , it is an elastic collision , not inelastic.
     
  6. Dec 19, 2014 #5

    haruspex

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    The OP says it is inelastic, so work is not conserved. It may be that garr6120 has stated the problem incorrectly, but I see no reason to suppose so.
     
  7. Dec 19, 2014 #6
    Yeah! I too have doubt about that. But I think if the value of coefficient of restitution is given then that question can be solved even if the collision is inelastic.
     
  8. Dec 19, 2014 #7
    Oh ,, I thought that it is elastic since the two object doesn't stuck together ,,
    I was wrong
    :)
     
  9. Dec 19, 2014 #8

    haruspex

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    Right. To be honest, it has always seemed strange to me that 'elastic' is taken to mean perfectly elastic, i.e. no energy loss, and 'inelastic' for when there is any energy loss. It feels more natural to reserve inelastic for the case of zero coefficient of restitution and regard all nonzero restitution as varying degrees of elasticity. But there it is.
     
  10. Dec 19, 2014 #9
    I understand now, But in this question he didn't provide the coefficient of restitution .thus , the question is a little bit confusing .
     
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