1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Inertial and static friction?

  1. Sep 6, 2009 #1
    HI guys, i was wondering what is the difference between inertial and static friction? If a car is on a frictionless ground, does it have static friction and the inertial is the same even if it is on a rough surface right?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 6, 2009 #2

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    What do you mean by "inertial" friction? Are you thinking of kinetic friction?
    If the ground is frictionless, how can there be static friction?
     
  4. Sep 6, 2009 #3
    erm nope i am talking about inertial of a mass.
     
  5. Sep 6, 2009 #4

    kuruman

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    What is your understanding of what "inertial of a mass" is? I am not sure what you mean by this term.
     
  6. Sep 6, 2009 #5
    Actually i meant inertial an i believe inertial is the resistance of mass to a change of its state of motion.Am i right?
     
  7. Sep 6, 2009 #6

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I think you mean inertia, which is measured by mass. If so, can you restate your question, as I don't understand how that relates to friction.
     
  8. Sep 6, 2009 #7
    Sorry about that, i meant to ask whether inertia changes if the surface is frictionless
     
  9. Sep 6, 2009 #8

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    "Inertia" is a property of a body due to its mass. Why would it change?
     
  10. Sep 6, 2009 #9
    yeah that was what i though. so when force is applied to an object, the force only have to exceed the static force in order for it to move right? What about inertia?
     
  11. Sep 6, 2009 #10

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Right. If you are trying to push a box along a rough horizontal surface, then to start it moving you must push with a force that exceeds the maximum static friction between the box and the surface.
    What about it?

    Perhaps you are thinking of how much force is required to get something moving if there is no friction? What do you think? If that box is on a frictionless surface, how hard do you have to push it to start it moving?
     
  12. Sep 6, 2009 #11
    If there is no friction that means the object will move and continue its state of motion even if the force is very little?
     
  13. Sep 6, 2009 #12

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Right! From Newton's 2nd law, if you apply a net force F, the mass will have an acceleration = F/m. The harder you push, the greater the acceleration, but even the slightest push will create some acceleration.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Inertial and static friction?
  1. Static friction (Replies: 12)

  2. Static friction (Replies: 6)

  3. Static friction? (Replies: 8)

Loading...