Infinite regression/progression

  • Thread starter wavelength
  • Start date
what are your thoughts on the theory of infinite r/p
if you dont know what it is,
Infinite regression is the idea that if you split an electron (or whatever elementary particle) you get an even more elementary particle, if you split this particle you will get a more elementay particle and so on.
Infinite progression is the idea that our universe is just an elementary particle in an even vaster universe which, in turn, is itself an elementary particle and so on...
This idea has always intrigued me since i was a kid. (not that i am any less of a punk kid now)
P.S. sorry if "Progression" is the wrong word, but you get the idea!
 
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I suspect that this idea

has occured to many of us, it certainly did to me. It's interesting but not very productive of insight.

When you try to "split" an electron all kinds of stuff falls out, but so far it's pretty much all been catalogued and it would be hard to describe them as "electron pieces".

The problem with the progression part is that "elementary particles" are statistically interchangable in a sense that can't really be described classicaly. The universes would have to be interchangeable too.
 

jeff

Science Advisor
658
1
Originally posted by wavelength ...if you split an electron (or whatever elementary particle) you get an even more elementary particle...
Elementary particles are by definition not decomposable, i.e. if they can be split, they're not elementary.
 

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