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Infinite sheet problem

  1. Apr 17, 2009 #1
    http://www.ph.ed.ac.uk/teaching/course-notes/documents/76/1000-Jun2001.PDF

    in q5, the second part of the question. How do we even start to do this? (it's the bit about finding the field if you assume that it's part of an infinitely large flat sheet of material)

    my field from the first part of the question is

    [itex]E(P)=\frac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_0} \frac{qd}{a}[/itex]

    since [itex]dE_z=\frac{dq}{4 \pi \epsilon_0}{\vec{a} \cdot \vec{\hat{z}}}{a^3}=\frac{1}{4 \pi \epsilon_0} \frac{dq a \cos{\theta}}{a^3}[/itex] then i cancelled the a's and subbed [itex]\cos{\theta}=\frac{d}{a}[/itex]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 18, 2009 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Electromagnetism

    I believe that problem concerning the infinite sheet means using a ring method of integration.

    Each ring has charge C*2πr dr, and each ring contributes to the E-field at P.

    For an infinite sheet, 0 < r < ∞
     
  4. Apr 19, 2009 #3
    Re: Electromagnetism

    im a bit confused - does that mean i get the total charge by [itex]\int_0^{\infty} C 2 \pi r dr[/itex]???
     
  5. Apr 19, 2009 #4

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Electromagnetism

    Yes, but one wishes to find E(P), so one must dE from all the infinitesimal rings for 0 to ∞. Note that as r -> ∞, the angle from the vertical axis to the line from P to the ring of charge.
     
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