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Information about interaction potential from ionizing inert gases

  1. May 22, 2009 #1
    Hey guys,

    Got this question for a small essay:

    "Explain how observations of electron impact ionization scattering from inert gas atoms provide information on the interaction potential, the electron momentum distributions of the electronic shells of the atom and the angular momentum of the bound electrons."

    Now i know some vauge qualatative details, ie the relative size and rotation of the electron scattering lobes give information about the energy distribution of the electrons and i have some more information in my lecture notes however i am required to read outside, which is fine. The problem being all i can find are papers on the cross sections of ionization processes and no good introduction or information on how these experiments function really.

    What i understand at a glance: the interaction potential will influence any back scattering of the incoming electron, ie at low energies it is emitted in the forward direction but 'dragged back' and will also impact on the ionization energy for the bound electron.

    The summed momenta of the scattered electrons will be (i assume) the same as the sum of the incoming and bound thus one can infer the momentum of the bound electron.

    And i assume that as usual angular momentum will follow a similar conservation law although im not sure the details on spin except that perhaps if both electrons are emitted with the same energy they must have opposite spins (or does indistinguisability only apply for bound systems?)

    I hope the above made sense, im not asking for answers rather resources i can use (because obviously i can't reference this forum =) )

    Cheers
    -Z
     
  2. jcsd
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