Inns of Court in London

  • #1
332
1
Are the Inns of Court in London, Lincoln Inn, Middle Temple, Inner Temple, Gray's Inn, equivalent of Bar Associations in most other countries?

After completing law degree (LLB or JD) one has to register with one of the inns to get a practice license?

I think the term 'barrister' is used in England and Wales, and in other countries such as India equivalent term 'advocate' is in fashion. Then, there is another term 'solicitor'. I think solicitor is a lawyer/attorney who DOES NOT plead cases in courts. I didn't use "CANNOT" because I believe one becomes a solicitor by one's own choice. Once one registers with some bar, then it's up to the one's own discretion whether one would like to plead or not. I think it would be good to first start working as a solicitor under an advocate for some time and once one has enough knowledge of inner workings of legal system, one can start the role of an advocate by starting his personal practice. Am I correct?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #3
cristo
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
8,107
73
I don't know an answer to the technicalities, and am not sure that many of our members will be able to help. What stage of your education are you at? Have you tried asking someone who might know more about the legal profession or, failing that, you could perhaps seek an internet forum more relevant to the question (I'm sure there are many out there).

By the way, I think your definition of solicitor/barrister is slightly incorrect: a solicitor can plead cases in courts, but only the lower ones (county or magistrate), whereas a barrister has the right to an audience in all courts.
 

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