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Inside looking out

  1. Feb 25, 2006 #1
    It is pretty well known that you cannot see inside of a black hole from the "outside" universe. It is rather obvious as to why this is because gravity is so strong that everything including light gets sucked in but I just read that you cannot see the "outside" universe from inside of a black hole (assuming one wasn't crushed first). Why is this so? Thanks RAD
     
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  3. Feb 26, 2006 #2
    I think it's because you can't see anything without a light source. Because you are now where it is completely dark, the only way you could see anything is if you turned on a spotlight or something but once you did turn that on all that light wouldn't go anywhere because it would be getting sucked in too.
     
  4. Feb 26, 2006 #3

    George Jones

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    It's not so.

    See this post of mine, and other posts in the thread.

    Also, if the black hole is massive enough, you won't get torn apart by tidal forces before crossing the event horizon.

    Regards,
    George
     
  5. Feb 27, 2006 #4

    Phobos

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    Well, at the singularity (point) nothing different exists to view...it's well, singular.

    Inside the event horizon, but before hitting the singularity, I suppose time dilation would be so extreme that the outside universe unviewable.
     
  6. Feb 27, 2006 #5

    George Jones

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    No, at least not for the interior of an ideal Schwarzschild black hole. As I said in my post, images are seen - some blushifted some redshifted. Also, the scare quotes I put around 'at' mean in the limit as the singularity is approached.

    The book Exploring Black Holes by Taylor and Wheeler gives a readable account of how to derive just what is seen.

    Regards,
    George
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2006
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