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Inside the blackhole

  1. Nov 3, 2005 #1
    What is inside the blackhole? It is a tunnel for other universe or anything else.
    what happen to us when we go inside the black hole?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 3, 2005 #2

    Danger

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    No one knows exactly what's inside. I'm not entirely sure that you can even presume that there is an 'inside', since it's supposedly a dimensionless point.
    You can't get there in any form that you'd care to experience anyway. The tidal forces would rip you to subatomic particles long before impact, and you'd most likely be dead from X-ray poisoning even sooner.
     
  4. Nov 3, 2005 #3

    edit: forgot the quote tags
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2005
  5. Nov 3, 2005 #4

    Labguy

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    That was used several times in your post. Black holes do not have infinite mass. If they did, we wouldn't be having threads on black holes of stellar size, 100 solar masses, supermassive in galactic cores, etc. They would all be the same, ie infinite.
    I presume you are trying to describe a singularity of zero point size and infinite density.(?) I know that the math works for that description, but I think that nobody today would accept that there could be any non-rotating black holes, so maybe we could change that to a ring singularity. Also, there are many (I have read) who won't buy the idea of even infinite density, that is a ring singularity with a width dimention, but of zero thickness. I think that huge density is replacing infinite, since a singularity should be at least a minimum of Planck size. That would be very dense, but not infinite.
     
  6. Nov 3, 2005 #5
    Now that makes sense, forgive me what was posted above by was not my words, i just forgot the quote tags, infinite mass (now that you point it out) doesn't sound right, because if that was the case then there wouldn't be particular sizes to any of the blackholes documented so far, right?
     
  7. Nov 3, 2005 #6

    Labguy

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    That's the way I would think...:smile: A bunch of black holes, each with infinite mass, would sure solve the 'ol dark matter problem and there would be a "big crunch" in the near future......:yuck:
     
  8. Nov 3, 2005 #7

    hellfire

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    A black hole is the region within a event horizon. According to general relativity we know what happens there, altough we will not be able to observe it. For example, we know that no stable orbits exist there and that everything must decrease its radial distance falling towads the singularity. What we do not know is how to describe the singularity, which is the central, infinitely dense point of a black hole.
     
  9. Nov 3, 2005 #8
    I don't agree with the supposing about spaghetti, it's true for an external observator but everything is normal to whom is entering the black hole as space time is completely different, so the spaghetti are just the result of the distorted immage sent to the external observator.
    What do you think about "space density"?
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2005
  10. Nov 3, 2005 #9

    Danger

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    I'm not sure that I understand your objection to the spaghetti reference, Pippo. That's exactly the effect that tidal forces have (except that the noodles also get narrower toward the hole). It happens because of the inverse square law of gravity. The closer you get, the more the pull on the near end exceeds the pull on the far end.
     
  11. Nov 3, 2005 #10
    The appearance of your body being stretched out like a piece of spaghetti isn't relative to you, an observer, or anything else. Your body is literally being pulled apart by the immense force of gravity...good times!
     
  12. Nov 3, 2005 #11
    I am not referring to the effects of gravity onthe human body, perhaps I misunderstood, I was just saying that if I enter the black hole with a meter I will always measure me as 1,80 m high while for my friend on the earth I have disappeared.
    (Apologize my english is not so good)
     
  13. Nov 3, 2005 #12

    Danger

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    Oh, I see; you're referring to relativistic effects due to gravity. In that case, ignoring the physical hardship, you're right. Your time, mass and length will appear normal to you.
     
  14. Nov 6, 2005 #13
    Given this as true, how does this reflect on the big-bang theory? I mean, how can there be certain values for todays universe if it were born from infinite mass etc at the start? Does this mean the mass of the universe today is infinite and if not how do we get from infinity to a certain value for the mass of todays universe?
     
  15. Nov 7, 2005 #14

    hellfire

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    There is nothing in the big-bang model that requires infinite mass of the universe at any time of its evolution. However, the model contains a singularity at t = 0 which is a state of infinite density.
     
  16. Nov 8, 2005 #15
    Wormholes!

    The tunnel you are talking about is a wormhole. This concept is very appealing to science fiction writers: "tunnelling through the contorted space-time geometry of blackholes into another universe or emerge into our own universe at some other time and space."
     
  17. Nov 8, 2005 #16
    sorry maam you are wrong because it is not a science fiction. It going to be true but after few year.
     
  18. Nov 8, 2005 #17
    Maybe it is just me but im really getting a bit annoyed at your posts, which seem to be all fubar, do you even know about wormholes? Right now they only exist in mathematics, the schwartzchild wormhole violates the second law of thermodynamics, but this isn't the only wormhole to be concieved by a physicist.

    The Einstein-Rosen bridge was another theory of wormhole, which again only exists in mathematics.
    http://www.cakes.mcmail.com/StarTrek/worm.htm

    Now some of these require an "exotic mater" that has a negative charge in order to keep the wormhole open if not it collapses on itself, leaving the would be traveler, dead. The problem is that we don't know whether this matter exists and wormholes will require vast amounts of it.
     
  19. Nov 8, 2005 #18

    Danger

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    There's also, as I recall, a huge and continuously escalating amount of negative energy required. I assume that your reference to the negative matter is in regard to producing that?
     
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