Medical Insulin and Glucagon

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Summary
The endocrine system maintains homeostasis by the action of antagonistic hormones. Why don't they destroy each other to the point of complete destruction in the race against each other?
We know that insulin and Glucagon are considered antagonistic hormones as they help us to maintain the homeostatic glucose level for our cells.

When the concentration of blood glucose rises (after eating, for example), beta cells of the pancreas secrete insulin into the blood. Insulin helps to store the excess glucose into storage cells like liver and adipose cells. When the blood glucose level is reduced, Glucagon kicks in and brings more glucose into blood circulation.

At this condition, what prevents insulin to be kicked in again? If so, the glucose produced by the glucagon would be pushed again into storage cells, unnecessarily. Obviously body is not doing this futile act.

I would like to know, how the body decides if the glucose that is circulated is from food (for which insulin may be necessary) or from gluconeogenesis etc (for which insulin should not be produced)?

Also, is there a condition or possibility wherein both insulin and glucagon would be high or low, ie., in a similar state?
 

pinball1970

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Summary: The endocrine system maintains homeostasis by the action of antagonistic hormones. Why don't they destroy each other to the point of complete destruction in the race against each other?

We know that insulin and Glucagon are considered antagonistic hormones as they help us to maintain the homeostatic glucose level for our cells.

When the concentration of blood glucose rises (after eating, for example), beta cells of the pancreas secrete insulin into the blood. Insulin helps to store the excess glucose into storage cells like liver and adipose cells. When the blood glucose level is reduced, Glucagon kicks in and brings more glucose into blood circulation.

At this condition, what prevents insulin to be kicked in again? If so, the glucose produced by the glucagon would be pushed again into storage cells, unnecessarily. Obviously body is not doing this futile act.

I would like to know, how the body decides if the glucose that is circulated is from food (for which insulin may be necessary) or from gluconeogenesis etc (for which insulin should not be produced)?

Also, is there a condition or possibility wherein both insulin and glucagon would be high or low, ie., in a similar state?
Did you check the link? A decent biochemistry book will give you the details. Are you studying?
 

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