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News Insurance for delivering babies costs so much, the doctor can’t practice

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  1. Dec 13, 2003 #1

    Monique

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    http://msnbc.msn.com/Default.aspx?id=3660762&p1=0" [Broken]

    "malpractice premiums that soared from $12,000 in 2000 to $57,000 in 2003"

    "Anything less than perfection is malpractice"


    It is a shame..
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 1, 2017
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  3. Dec 13, 2003 #2

    Monique

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    nw_300_magcover_031210.gif

    http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3660738/" [Broken]
     
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  4. Dec 13, 2003 #3
    The lawsuit thing is a lie, Monique...or at least a misrepresentation. The actual payout on malpractice suits hase remained steady for years, yet insurance premiums keep going up. The insurance companies and the AMA are at fault, not the lawyers.
     
  5. Dec 13, 2003 #4

    Monique

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    Which lawsuit thing are you referring to?

    The payout may be the same, but the reasons and the frequency with which people sue must be on the increase, a lot probably. This is why premiums are going up at the same time.
     
  6. Dec 13, 2003 #5
    That doesn't follow at all; I'm including out-of-court settlements and court awards. Those totals have remained fairly consistant, so the costs to insurance companies haven't changed that much. Your statement " the reasons and the frequency with which people sue must be on the increase, a lot probably" doesn't match the facts. Further, caps on lawsuit payouts haven't affected insurance costs for the better: the five states with the highest insurance premiums all have strict lawsuit restrictions and awards caps. The insurance companies have raised rates with no conneection to higher costs due to lawsuits.
     
  7. Dec 13, 2003 #6

    Monique

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    Yes, that could very well be.. that's why I said 'may' and 'probably' because I don't have the figures. So where would I go in search of those figures?

    So insurance companies are then to blame.. but malpractice premiums soaring from $12,000 in 2000 to $57,000 in 2003 is really A LOT of money..
     
  8. Dec 13, 2003 #7
    There is an artice in USA Today, March 5, 2003...not sure if it is archived online...also, the AMA has done some studies on it.

    The premiums are rising because people like you believe that there are alot of expensive lawsuits driving up prices; that simply isn't the case.
     
  9. Dec 13, 2003 #8

    Monique

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  10. Dec 13, 2003 #9
    American Medical Association
     
  11. Dec 13, 2003 #10
    For instance, Florida has capped awards in lawsuits, but you can still pay over 200,000 in malpractice insurance every year.
     
  12. Dec 13, 2003 #11
    BTW< the states that have the highest rates also have the highest rates of doctors who have been sued successfully five or more times. Losing a lawsuit once could be chalked up to some sort of legal problem; five or more losses would tend to imply that these are incompetent doctors, don't you think? Maybe instead of reforming the legal system, we need to reform state medical boards?
     
  13. Dec 13, 2003 #12

    ...or maybe BOTH need reform. A guy over here in the UK sued the council he rented his house from. He tried to change a light bulb in a tall stairway having first consumed 10 pints of beer. He fell and hurt himself and sued the council for placing the light fitting in 'an awkward place'.

    He was held 50% to blame. I suppose if he had drank 20 pints of beer then, rather than 10, it might have been ALL his fault?
     
  14. Dec 13, 2003 #13
    Frivolous lawsuits are one thing: there is nothing in liability caps that addresses the problem.
     
  15. Dec 13, 2003 #14
    We in the UK used to laugh at you 'stupid Americans all suing each other all the time'
    We do it ourselves now though and it isn't funny any longer. :frown:

    It does seem that it isn't possible to have an accident anymore, without it being someone elses fault. We all lose out in the end though, which I suppose is what Monique's point was.
     
  16. Dec 13, 2003 #15

    russ_watters

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    You don't live in Philadelphia, do you? Malpractice suits really are killing the medical field in Phila. And premiums don't rise because of public perception - insurance firms spend a lot of money playing with data to figure out what those premiums need to be for them to turn a profit.
     
  17. Dec 13, 2003 #16

    Kerrie

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    glad to see one state is taking some action on this...granted, some people truly deserve compesentation for wrong medical practices, but there are many who take advantage of this...
     
  18. Dec 13, 2003 #17
    Kerrie, you miss the point....caps don't affect insurance rates. California has done something, by reforming insurance companies, and leaving the lawyers alone.
     
  19. Dec 13, 2003 #18
    That's funny, Russ. You live in PA< and you don't even know what is going on in your5 own state?LOL(j/k, you don't know what is going on ANYWHERE when it comes to politics, do you? ) PA is #1 in DOCTORS WHO HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFULLY SUED MORE THAN 5 TIMES FOR MALPRACTICE!. Let me ask you a question, Russ: do you think it is really lawyers' fault in all five(or more) cases?

    Don't you believe in personal responsibility at all?
     
  20. Dec 13, 2003 #19

    Monique

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    Uhm, Zero? Don't you find it strange that this state has all the wrong doctors?

    I think people are sueing for all the wrong reasons, what happened to that lady anyway who suid her doctor for marking her.. uterus I believe which was to be taken out with his initials?

    I knew someone who was trying to start up his own biochem company and was sued 5 times in a few years for stupid reasons, just to make life difficult.
     
  21. Dec 13, 2003 #20

    Monique

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    Actually, one of my dutch friends went to the US and got sued twice! In a year! They won't let you work even without liability insurance since the US is so notorious.
     
  22. Dec 13, 2003 #21

    Monique

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    True or not, but the http://www.medicalmalpractice.com/National-Medical-Malpractice-Facts.cfm" [Broken] has this information:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 1, 2017
  23. Dec 13, 2003 #22

    Monique

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    J. Robert Hunter wrote a letter to the president on the erroneous data released to the public:

    http://www.consumerfed.org/MedicalMalpractice.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 1, 2017
  24. Dec 13, 2003 #23
    Come on now...do you guys really believe that peope are making up frivolous lawsuits as many times as that? Sounds like media-driven hysteria instead of relying on facts and reality. What i find is strange is that someone who is successfully sued five times is still practicing medicine, or that the AMA lobbied Congress to make sure that we (the public) never find out the names of doctors who have a history of malpractice.

    You know, if we were talking about criminals of the usual stripe claiming to be innocent, we would trust the judicial system...but if they are an incompetent doctor, we trust him over the patients and medical experts who testified against him in court? You know what I wonder? I wonder if our need to trust a doctor with our lives is tied into the refusal to accept that some doctors need to be sued, actually need to stop practicing medicine.
     
  25. Dec 13, 2003 #24

    Monique

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    You know, doctors are human and mistakes can be made. In stead of making a dime out of them, distracting them even more from what they should be doing, try to make the system foolproof.

    People are starting to think it is their right to sue, and forget that we live in the real world. My mom, she gave me a ride to the doctors office and when she walked into the building, she fell right into a gaping hole in the floor. Apparently some handymen had been doing some underground repair and the one who was supposed to warn visitors, had walked over to the receptionist for a second. The result? A gaping wound in my moms lower leg. Affortunately we were in the doctors office so a compress could be made quickly since it was bleeding awfully hard. We went to the hospital and she got lots of stiches, underskin and the skin self. Did we sue the handymen for €xxx.xxx,xxx? No, they came over at our house with a bouquet of flowers and we served them tea with a cookie. Where is the humanity for sueing their shirt off their bodies?

    IMPORTANT:
    If people are really that concerned with medical malpractice, why don't they complain to the medical board and have the doctor's license revoked???? Instead of going to court and get all the cash they want after which they live happily ever after..
     
  26. Dec 13, 2003 #25

    Monique

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    On making the system foolproof. Why are all the errors made? Probably because of illegible handwritings, counting errors, giving the same medicine twice, not communicating with other doctors who are treating the same patient for a different ailment.

    They are starting now with special barcodes which track the dose and medicine a patient is receiving in a hospital. They are also working on automating prescription drug pharmacies, where a doctor types in the drug at his computer, a machine at the pharmacy will take the correct medicine out of the rack and put the appropriate dose and label on the bottle.
     
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